Experimental E. coli diarrhea: Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin

R. L. Guerrant, C. C J Carpenter, N. F. Pierce

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In this study the authors show that viable E. coli from a patient with severe diarrhea can multiply and predictably induce fluid secretion in canine duodenal segments. As with human cholera, this is accompanied by an increase in mucosal adenyl cyclase activity without demonstrable histopathologic changes. Additionally, the potential of the control organisms to produce net fluid secretion without adenyl cyclase activation may define the limits of this model, but it also suggests that redistribution into the upper small bowel of normal colonic flora could play a role in the pathogenesis of other diarrheal states. Controlled studies with sterile cell free culture filtrates show that a brief exposure of canine jejunum to the enterotoxin from the E. coli causes simultaneous activation of mucosal adenyl cyclase and secretion of isotonic fluid. In contrast to the slow, prolonged action of cholera toxin, the onset of and recovery from both changes with E. coli enterotoxin occur within ten minutes. At submaximal doses the active enterotoxin can be shown to disappear from the small bowel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTransactions of the Association of American Physicians
Pages111-120
Number of pages10
VolumeNo. 86
StatePublished - 1973

Fingerprint

Fluids and Secretions
Enterotoxins
Adenylyl Cyclases
Diarrhea
Escherichia coli
Bacteria
Canidae
Cholera
Cholera Toxin
Jejunum
Cell Culture Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Guerrant, R. L., Carpenter, C. C. J., & Pierce, N. F. (1973). Experimental E. coli diarrhea: Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin. In Transactions of the Association of American Physicians (Vol. No. 86, pp. 111-120)

Experimental E. coli diarrhea : Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin. / Guerrant, R. L.; Carpenter, C. C J; Pierce, N. F.

Transactions of the Association of American Physicians. Vol. No. 86 1973. p. 111-120.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Guerrant, RL, Carpenter, CCJ & Pierce, NF 1973, Experimental E. coli diarrhea: Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin. in Transactions of the Association of American Physicians. vol. No. 86, pp. 111-120.
Guerrant RL, Carpenter CCJ, Pierce NF. Experimental E. coli diarrhea: Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin. In Transactions of the Association of American Physicians. Vol. No. 86. 1973. p. 111-120
Guerrant, R. L. ; Carpenter, C. C J ; Pierce, N. F. / Experimental E. coli diarrhea : Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin. Transactions of the Association of American Physicians. Vol. No. 86 1973. pp. 111-120
@inbook{95625a2dce014707ae8945ed32d623c7,
title = "Experimental E. coli diarrhea: Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin",
abstract = "In this study the authors show that viable E. coli from a patient with severe diarrhea can multiply and predictably induce fluid secretion in canine duodenal segments. As with human cholera, this is accompanied by an increase in mucosal adenyl cyclase activity without demonstrable histopathologic changes. Additionally, the potential of the control organisms to produce net fluid secretion without adenyl cyclase activation may define the limits of this model, but it also suggests that redistribution into the upper small bowel of normal colonic flora could play a role in the pathogenesis of other diarrheal states. Controlled studies with sterile cell free culture filtrates show that a brief exposure of canine jejunum to the enterotoxin from the E. coli causes simultaneous activation of mucosal adenyl cyclase and secretion of isotonic fluid. In contrast to the slow, prolonged action of cholera toxin, the onset of and recovery from both changes with E. coli enterotoxin occur within ten minutes. At submaximal doses the active enterotoxin can be shown to disappear from the small bowel.",
author = "Guerrant, {R. L.} and Carpenter, {C. C J} and Pierce, {N. F.}",
year = "1973",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "No. 86",
pages = "111--120",
booktitle = "Transactions of the Association of American Physicians",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Experimental E. coli diarrhea

T2 - Effects of viable bacteria and enterotoxin

AU - Guerrant, R. L.

AU - Carpenter, C. C J

AU - Pierce, N. F.

PY - 1973

Y1 - 1973

N2 - In this study the authors show that viable E. coli from a patient with severe diarrhea can multiply and predictably induce fluid secretion in canine duodenal segments. As with human cholera, this is accompanied by an increase in mucosal adenyl cyclase activity without demonstrable histopathologic changes. Additionally, the potential of the control organisms to produce net fluid secretion without adenyl cyclase activation may define the limits of this model, but it also suggests that redistribution into the upper small bowel of normal colonic flora could play a role in the pathogenesis of other diarrheal states. Controlled studies with sterile cell free culture filtrates show that a brief exposure of canine jejunum to the enterotoxin from the E. coli causes simultaneous activation of mucosal adenyl cyclase and secretion of isotonic fluid. In contrast to the slow, prolonged action of cholera toxin, the onset of and recovery from both changes with E. coli enterotoxin occur within ten minutes. At submaximal doses the active enterotoxin can be shown to disappear from the small bowel.

AB - In this study the authors show that viable E. coli from a patient with severe diarrhea can multiply and predictably induce fluid secretion in canine duodenal segments. As with human cholera, this is accompanied by an increase in mucosal adenyl cyclase activity without demonstrable histopathologic changes. Additionally, the potential of the control organisms to produce net fluid secretion without adenyl cyclase activation may define the limits of this model, but it also suggests that redistribution into the upper small bowel of normal colonic flora could play a role in the pathogenesis of other diarrheal states. Controlled studies with sterile cell free culture filtrates show that a brief exposure of canine jejunum to the enterotoxin from the E. coli causes simultaneous activation of mucosal adenyl cyclase and secretion of isotonic fluid. In contrast to the slow, prolonged action of cholera toxin, the onset of and recovery from both changes with E. coli enterotoxin occur within ten minutes. At submaximal doses the active enterotoxin can be shown to disappear from the small bowel.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0015698044&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0015698044&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

C2 - 4596448

AN - SCOPUS:0015698044

VL - No. 86

SP - 111

EP - 120

BT - Transactions of the Association of American Physicians

ER -