Experimental coronavirus retinopathy (ECOR): Retinal degeneration susceptible mice have an augmented interferon and chemokine (CXCL9, CXCL10) response early after virus infection

Barbara Detrick, Maria Teresa Lee, Marian S. Chin, Laura C. Hooper, Chi Chao Chan, John J. Hooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus induces a biphasic disease in BALB/c mice that consists of an acute retinitis followed by progression to a chronic retinal degeneration with autoimmune reactivity. Retinal degeneration resistant CD-1 mice do not develop the late phase. What host factors contribute to the distinct responses to the virus are unknown. Herein, we show that IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-γ act in concert as part of the innate immune response to the retinal infection. At day 2, high serum levels of IFN-γ, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were detected in BALB/c mice. Moreover, elevated levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 gene expression were detected in retinal tissue. Although IFN-γ and the chemokines were detected in CD-1 mice, they were at significantly lower levels compared to BALB/c mice. These augmented innate responses observed correlated with the development of autoimmune reactivity and retinal degeneration and thus may contribute to the pathogenic processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-37
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume193
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Keywords

  • Autoimmunity
  • Chemokines
  • Coronavirus
  • Interferon
  • Retinal degeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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