Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery

Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, Alicia B. Dagle, Peter Kazanzides, Emad Boctor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Endonasal transsphenoidal surgery is an effective approach for pituitary adenoma resection, yet it poses the serious risk of internal carotid artery injury. We propose to visualize these carotid arteries, which are hidden by bone, with an optical fiber attached to a surgical tool and a transcranial ultrasound probe placed on the patient's temple (i.e. intraoperative photoacoustic imaging). To investigate energy requirements for vessel visualization, experiments were conducted with a phantom containing ex vivo sheep brain, ex vivo bovine blood, and 0.5-2.5 mm thick human cadaveric skull specimens. Photoacoustic images were acquired with 1.2-9.3 mJ laser energy, and the resulting vessel contrast was measured at each energy level. The distal vessel boundary was difficult to distinguish at the chosen contrast threshold for visibility (4.5 dB), which was used to determine the minimum energies for vessel visualization. The blood vessel was successfully visualized in the presence of the 0-2.0 mm thick sphenoid and temporal bones with up to 19.2 dB contrast. The minimum energy required ranged from 1.2-5.0 mJ, 4.2-5.9 mJ, and 4.6-5.2 mJ for the 1.0 temporal and 0-1.5 mm sphenoid bones, 1.5 mm temporal and 0-0.5 mm sphenoid bones, and 2.0 mm temporal and 0-0.5 mm sphenoid bones, respectively, which corresponds to a fluence range of 4-21 mJ/cm2. These results hold promise for vessel visualization within safety limits. In a separate experiment, a mock tool tip was placed, providing satisfactory preliminary evidence that surgical tool tips can be visualized simultaneously with blood vessels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016
PublisherSPIE
Volume9708
ISBN (Electronic)9781628419429
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
EventPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016 - San Francisco, United States
Duration: Feb 14 2016Feb 17 2016

Other

OtherPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period2/14/162/17/16

Fingerprint

Sphenoid Bone
energy requirements
Photoacoustic effect
visibility
surgery
Visibility
Surgery
bones
vessels
Bone
Visualization
blood vessels
Blood Vessels
Blood vessels
arteries
Carotid Artery Injuries
Optical Fibers
Temporal Bone
Pituitary Neoplasms
Internal Carotid Artery

Keywords

  • endonasal transsphenoidal surgery
  • energy limits
  • head phantom
  • laser safety
  • maximum permissible exposure (MPE)
  • phased array ultrasound probe
  • surgical tool visualization
  • Transcranial photoacoustic imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Lediju Bell, M. A., Dagle, A. B., Kazanzides, P., & Boctor, E. (2016). Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery. In Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016 (Vol. 9708). [97080D] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2213220

Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery. / Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Dagle, Alicia B.; Kazanzides, Peter; Boctor, Emad.

Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016. Vol. 9708 SPIE, 2016. 97080D.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lediju Bell, MA, Dagle, AB, Kazanzides, P & Boctor, E 2016, Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery. in Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016. vol. 9708, 97080D, SPIE, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016, San Francisco, United States, 2/14/16. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2213220
Lediju Bell MA, Dagle AB, Kazanzides P, Boctor E. Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery. In Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016. Vol. 9708. SPIE. 2016. 97080D https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2213220
Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A. ; Dagle, Alicia B. ; Kazanzides, Peter ; Boctor, Emad. / Experimental assessment of energy requirements and tool tip visibility for photoacoustic-guided endonasal surgery. Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2016. Vol. 9708 SPIE, 2016.
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