Experimental Argon Laser Photocoagulation: III. Relative Dangers of Immediate vs Delayed Retreatment

David J. Apple, George J. Wyhinny, Morton F. Goldberg, James W. Bizzell, John P. Broderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Monkey retinas were studied histopathologically to assess the relative effects of immediate versus delayed repetitive photocoagulation with the argon laser. Immediate retreatment adds relatively little damage to that created in the retinal nerve fiber layer by the initial photocoagulation. Delayed retreatment increases destruction of all retinal layers, including the nerve fiber layer, and also increases the chance of inducing hemorrhage. When argon laser retreatment of a retinal locus is necessary, it is much safer to do so immediately (within a few hours) rather than after days or weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-312
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of ophthalmology
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1976
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Argon laser
  • delayed retreatment
  • immediate retreatment
  • multiple photocoagulations
  • photocoagulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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