Expanding the scope of risk assessment: Methods of studying differential vulnerability and susceptibility

Joel Schwartz, David Bellinger, Thomas Glass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Several methodological issues have been identified in analysis of epidemiological data to better assess the distributional effects of exposures and hypotheses about effect modification. We discuss the hierarchical mixed model and some more complex methods. Methods of capturing inequality are a second dimension of risk assessment, and simulation studies are important because plausible choices for air pollution effects and effect modifiers could result in extremely high risks in a small subset of the population. Future epidemiological studies should explore contextual and individual-level factors that might modify these relationships. The Environmental Protection Agency should make this a standard part of their risk assessments whenever the necessary information is available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S102-S109
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume101
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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