Expanded safety and immunogenicity of a bivalent, oral, attenuated cholera vaccine, CVD 103-HgR plus CVD 111, in United States military personnel stationed in Panama

David N. Taylor, José L. Sanchez, José M. Castro, Carlos Lebron, Carlos M. Parrado, David E. Johnson, Carol O. Tacket, Genevieve A. Losonsky, Steven S. Wasserman, Myron M. Levine, Stanley J. Cryz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To provide optimum protection against classical and El Tor biotypes of vibrio cholerae O1, a single-dose, oral cholera vaccine was developed by combining two live, attenuated vaccine strains, CVD 103-HgR (classical, Inaba) and CVD 111 (El Tor, Ogawa). The vaccines were formulated in a double- chamber sachet; one chamber contained lyophilized bacteria, and the other contained buffer. A total of 170 partially-immune American soldiers stationed in Panama received one of the following five formulations: (a) CVD 103-HgR at 108 CFU plus CVD 111 at 107 CFU, (b) CVD 103-HgR at 108 CFU plus CVD 111 at 106 CFU, (c) CVD 103-HgR alone at 108 CFU, (d) CVI) 111 alone at 107 CFU, or (e) inactivated Escherichia coli placebo. Among those who received CVD 111 at the high or low dose either alone or in combination with CVD 103- HgR, 8 of 103 had diarrhea, defined as three or more liquid stools. None of the 32 volunteers who received CVD 103-HgR alone or the 35 placebo recipients had diarrhea. CVD 111 was detected in the stools of 46% of the 103 volunteers who received it. About 65% of all persons who received CVD 103-HgR either alone or in combination had a fourfold rise in Inaba vibriocidal titers. The postvaccination geometric mean titers were comparable among groups, ranging from 450 to 550. Ogawa vibriocidal titers were about twice as high in persons who received CVD 111 as in those who received CVD 103-HgR alone (600 versus 300). The addition of CVD 111 improved the overall seroconversion rate and doubled the serum Ogawa vibriocidal titers, suggesting that the combination of an El Tor and a classical cholera strain is desirable. While CVD 111 was previously found to be well tolerated in semiimmune Peruvians, the adverse effects observed in this study indicate that this strain requires further attenuation before it can be safely used in nonimmune populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2030-2034
Number of pages5
JournalInfection and immunity
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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