Exertional heatstroke and muscle metabolism: an in vivo 31P-MRS study

Jean François Payen, Lionel Bourdon, Henri Reutenauer, Bruno Melin, Jean François Le Bas, Paul Stieglitz, Michel Cure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An impairment of muscle energy metabolism has been suggested as a predisposing factor for, as well as a consequence of exertional heatstroke (EHS). Thirteen young men were investigated 6 months after a well-documented EHS using 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The relative concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphomonoesters (PME), and the intracellular pH (pHi) were determined at rest, during a graded standardized exercise protocol (360 active plantar flexions) and during recovery. Also the leg tissue blood flow was determined by venous occlusion plethysmog-raphy during the MRS procedure. Sixteen age-matched healthy male volunteers served as control group. In resting muscle, there were no significant differences between the groups as regards pHi, Pi/PCr, and ATP/PCr+Pi+PME ratios. During steady state exercise conditions, effective power outputs were similar for both groups at each level of exercise:20, 35, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the calf muscle. No significant differences were shown between the two groups in Pi/PCr, pHi, or changes of leg blood flow at each level of exercise. At 50% MVC, Pi/PCr was 0.48 ± 0.08 vs 0.47 ± 0.05 (P = 0.96), pHi was 6.94 ± 0.03 vs 6.99 ± 0.02, respectively (P = 0.13). Finally, the rate of PCr resynthesis during recovery was not significantly different between the two groups:tv, PCr = 0.58 ± 0.07 vs 0.50 ± 0.05 min, respectively (P = 0.35). Therefore, no evidence of an impairment of muscle energy metabolism was shown in the EHS group during a standardized submaximal exercise using 31P-MRS performed 6 months after an EHS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-425
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume24
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heat Stroke
Phosphocreatine
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Muscles
Phosphates
Exercise
Energy Metabolism
Leg
Adenosine Triphosphate
Muscle Contraction
Causality
Healthy Volunteers
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Energy metabolism
  • Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • Plethysmography
  • Skeletal muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Payen, J. F., Bourdon, L., Reutenauer, H., Melin, B., Le Bas, J. F., Stieglitz, P., & Cure, M. (1992). Exertional heatstroke and muscle metabolism: an in vivo 31P-MRS study. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 24(4), 420-425.

Exertional heatstroke and muscle metabolism : an in vivo 31P-MRS study. / Payen, Jean François; Bourdon, Lionel; Reutenauer, Henri; Melin, Bruno; Le Bas, Jean François; Stieglitz, Paul; Cure, Michel.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 24, No. 4, 1992, p. 420-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Payen, JF, Bourdon, L, Reutenauer, H, Melin, B, Le Bas, JF, Stieglitz, P & Cure, M 1992, 'Exertional heatstroke and muscle metabolism: an in vivo 31P-MRS study', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 420-425.
Payen JF, Bourdon L, Reutenauer H, Melin B, Le Bas JF, Stieglitz P et al. Exertional heatstroke and muscle metabolism: an in vivo 31P-MRS study. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1992;24(4):420-425.
Payen, Jean François ; Bourdon, Lionel ; Reutenauer, Henri ; Melin, Bruno ; Le Bas, Jean François ; Stieglitz, Paul ; Cure, Michel. / Exertional heatstroke and muscle metabolism : an in vivo 31P-MRS study. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1992 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 420-425.
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