Executive functioning, barriers to adherence, and nonadherence in adolescent and young adult transplant recipients

Ana M. Gutiérrez-Colina, Cyd K. Eaton, Jennifer L. Lee, Bonney Reed-Knight, Kristin Loiselle, Laura L. Mee, Julia LaMotte, Rochelle Liverman, Ronald L. Blount

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective To evaluate levels of executive functioning in a sample of adolescent and young adult (AYA) transplant recipients, and to examine executive functioning in association with barriers to adherence and medication nonadherence. Method In all, 41 caregivers and 39 AYAs were administered self- and proxy-report measures. Results AYA transplant recipients have significant impairments in executive functioning abilities. Greater dysfunction in specific domains of executive functioning was significantly associated with more barriers to adherence and greater medication nonadherence. Conclusion AYA transplant recipients are at increased risk for executive dysfunction. The assessment of executive functioning abilities may guide intervention efforts designed to decrease barriers to adherence and promote developmentally appropriate levels of treatment responsibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-767
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume41
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Adolescents and young adults
  • Barriers
  • Executive functioning
  • Transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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