Excessive adiposity at low BMI levels among women in rural Bangladesh

Saijuddin Shaikh, Jessica Jones-Smith, Kerry J Schulze, Hasmot Ali, Parul S Christian, Abu Ahmed Shamim, Sucheta Mehra, Alain B Labrique, Rolf Klemm, Lee Shu Fune Wu, Mahbubur Rashid, Keith West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Asian populations have a higher percentage body fat (%BF) and are at higher risk for CVD and related complications at a given BMI compared with those of European descent. We explored whether %BF was disproportionately elevated in rural Bangladeshi women with low BMI. Height, weight, mid-upper arm circumference, triceps and subscapular skinfolds and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) were measured in 1555 women at 3 months postpartum. %BF was assessed by skinfolds and by BIA. BMI was calculated in adults and BMI Z-scores were calculated for females <20 years old. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves found the BMI and BMI Z-score cut-offs that optimally classified women as having moderately excessive adipose tissue (defined as >30 % body fat). Linear regressions estimated the association between BMI and BMI Z-score (among adolescents) and %BF. Mean BMI was 19·2 (SD 2·2) kg/m2, and mean %BF was calculated as 23·7 (SD 4·8) % by skinfolds and 23·3 (SD 4·9) % by BIA. ROC analyses indicated that a BMI value of approximately 21 kg/m2 optimised sensitivity (83·6 %) and specificity (84·2 %) for classifying subjects with >30 % body fat according to BIA among adults. This BMI level is substantially lower than the WHO recommended standard cut-off point of BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. The equivalent cut-off among adolescents was a BMI Z-score of –0·36, with a sensitivity of 81·3 % and specificity of 80·9 %. These findings suggest that Bangladeshi women exhibit excess adipose tissue at substantially lower BMI compared with non-South Asian populations. This is important for the identification and prevention of obesity-related metabolic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere11
JournalJournal of Nutritional Science
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2016

Fingerprint

rural women
bioelectrical impedance
Bangladesh
Adiposity
adiposity
Electric Impedance
Adipose Tissue
body fat
Sensitivity and Specificity
arm circumference
Metabolic Diseases
metabolic diseases
ROC Curve
Postpartum Period
Population
adipose tissue
Linear Models
Arm
obesity
Obesity

Keywords

  • Bangladeshi women
  • Bioelectrical impedance analysis
  • BMI
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Percentage body fat
  • Skinfolds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Excessive adiposity at low BMI levels among women in rural Bangladesh. / Shaikh, Saijuddin; Jones-Smith, Jessica; Schulze, Kerry J; Ali, Hasmot; Christian, Parul S; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Mehra, Sucheta; Labrique, Alain B; Klemm, Rolf; Wu, Lee Shu Fune; Rashid, Mahbubur; West, Keith.

In: Journal of Nutritional Science, Vol. 5, e11, 17.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Labrique, Alain B

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