Examining the Relationship Between Word Reading Efficiency and Oral Reading Rate in Predicting Comprehension Among Different Types of Readers

Sarah H. Eason, John Sabatini, Lindsay Goldberg, Kelly Bruce, Laurie E. Cutting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To further explore contextual reading rate, an important aspect of reading fluency, we examined the relationship between word reading efficiency (WRE) and contextual oral reading rate (ORR), the degree to which they overlap across different comprehension measures, whether oral language (semantics and syntax) predicts ORR beyond contributions of word-level skills, and whether the WRE-ORR relationship varies based on different reader profiles. Assessing reading and language of average readers, poor decoders, and poor comprehenders, ages 10 to 14, ORR was the strongest predictor of comprehension across various formats; WRE contributed no unique variance after taking ORR into account. Findings indicated that semantics, not syntax, contributed to ORR. Poor comprehenders performed below average on measures of ORR, despite average WRE, expanding previous findings suggesting specific weaknesses in ORR for this group. Together, findings suggest that ORR draws upon skills beyond those captured by WRE and suggests a role for oral language (semantics) in ORR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-223
Number of pages25
JournalScientific Studies of Reading
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

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