Examining the association between MAOA genotype and incarceration, anger and hostility: The moderating influences of risk and protective factors

Kevin M. Beaver, Joseph L. Nedelec, Meghan Wilde, Courtney Lippoff, Dylan Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Findings from molecular genetic research have indicated that a polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAOA gene interacts with environmental liabilities to predict antisocial phenotypes. We use these findings as a springboard to examine whether a global protective-risk factor index moderates the effect of MAOA genotype on the probability of being incarcerated and on a measure of anger and hostility. Analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) indicates that exposure to risk and protective factors in adolescence are able to moderate the effect of MAOA genotype on anger and hostility in adulthood for males. The results in relation to the probability of being incarcerated were consistently null.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-284
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Add Health
  • Anger
  • Gene-environment interaction
  • Hostility
  • Incarceration
  • MAOA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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