Examining subtypes of behavior problems among 3-year-old children, Part II: Investigating differences in parent psychopathology, couple conflict, and other family stressors

Lauren H. Goldstein, Elizabeth A. Harvey, Julie L. Friedman-Weieneth, Courtney Pierce, Alexis Tellert, Jenna C. Sippel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined family stressors among 3-year-old children who were classified as hyperactive (HYP), hyperactive and oppositional defiant (HYP/OD), and non-problem based on mothers' reports of behavior. Children with HYP/OD were found to experience higher levels of family stressors than non-problem children on almost every family stressor variable. Compared to children with HYP, families of children with HYP/OD also tended to report more Axis II maternal psychopathology, Axis I paternal psychopathology, and high intensity couple conflict tactics. However, the HYP and HYP/OD group did not significantly differ on maternal Axis I psychopathology, paternal Axis II psychopathology, parental marital status, negative life events, frequency of couple conflict, or use of lower intensity couple conflict tactics. Parents of children with HYP and HYP/OD reported more negative life events, more maternal adult ADHD symptoms, and more maternal avoidance and verbal aggression during marital conflict than parents of non-problem children. Implications for treatment and etiology are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-123
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Couple conflict
  • Hyperactivity
  • Oppositional-defiance
  • Parent psychopathology
  • Preschool-aged children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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