Examination of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis: A problem-orientated approach

Henry F. McFarland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has brought in several benefits to the study of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). It provides accurate measurement of disease activity, facilitates precise diagnosis, and aid in the assessment of newer therapies. The imaging guidelines for MS are broadly divided in to approaches for imaging patients with suspected MS or clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) or for monitoring patients with established MS. In this review, the technical aspects of MR imaging for MS are briefly discussed. The imaging process need to capture the twin aspects of acute MS viz. the autoimmune acute inflammatory process and the neurodegenerative process. Gadolinium enhanced MRI can identify acute inflammatory lesions precisely. The commonly applied MRI marker of disease progression is brain atrophy. Whole brain magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) are two other techniques use to monitor disease progression. A variety of imaging techniques such as Double Inversion Recovery (DIR), Spoiled Gradient Recalled (SPGR) acquisition, and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) have been utilized to study the cortical changes in MS. MRI is now extensively used in the Phase I, II and III clinical trials of new therapies. As the technical aspects of MRI advance rapidly, and higher field strengths become available, it is hoped that the impact of MRI on our understanding of MS will be even more profound in the next decade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-263
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Indian Academy of Neurology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Problem-oriented clinical approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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