Ex Vivo Neurogenesis within Enteric Ganglia Occurs in a PTEN Dependent Manner

Laren Becker, Johann Peterson, Subhash Kulkarni, Pankaj Jay Pasricha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A population of multipotent stem cells capable of differentiating into neurons and glia has been isolated from adult intestine in humans and rodents. While these cells may provide a pool of stem cells for neurogenesis in the enteric nervous system (ENS), such a function has been difficult to demonstrate in vivo. An extensive study by Joseph et al. involving 108 rats and 51 mice submitted to various insults demonstrated neuronal uptake of thymidine analog BrdU in only 1 rat. Here we introduce a novel approach to study neurogenesis in the ENS using an ex vivo organotypic tissue culturing system. Culturing longitudinal muscle and myenteric plexus tissue, we show that the enteric nervous system has tremendous replicative capacity with the majority of neural crest cells demonstrating EdU uptake by 48 hours. EdU+ cells express both neuronal and glial markers. Proliferation appears dependent on the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway with decreased PTEN mRNA expression and increased PTEN phosphorylation (inactivation) corresponding to increased Akt activity and proliferation. Inhibition of PTEN with bpV(phen) augments proliferation while LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, blocks it. These data suggest that the ENS is capable of neurogenesis in a PTEN dependent manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere59452
JournalPloS one
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2013

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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