Evolution of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in Asia

Jean Thierry Aubin, Saliha Azebi, Amanda Balish, Jill Banks, Niranjan Bhat, Rick A. Bright, Ian Brown, Philippe Buchy, Ana Maria Burguiere, Hua Ian Chen, Peter Cheng, Nancy J. Cox, Alice Crosier, Aaron Curns, Frédèrique Cuvelier, Guohua Deng, Julia Desheva, Stéphanie Desvaux, Nguyen Hong Diep, Ruben O. DonisAlan Douglas, Scott F. Dowell, Nguyen Tien Dung, Lindsay Edwards, Keiji Fukuda, Rebecca Garten, Elena Govorkova, Victoria Gregory, Alan Hampson, Nguyen Thi Hong Hanh, Scott Harper, Alan Hay, Erich Hoffmann, Diane Hulse, Masaki Imai, Shigeyuki Itamura, Samadhan Jadhao, Patricia Jeannin, Chun Kang, Jackie Katz, Jae Hong Kim, Alexander Klimov, Yong Kuk Kwon, Chang Won Lee, Phuong Song Lien, Yanbing Li, Wilina Lim, Yi Pu Lin, Stephen Lindstom, La Morris Loftin, Jan Mabry, Le Quynh Mai, Taronna Maines, Jean Claude Manuguerra, Masaji Mase, Yumi Matsuoka, Margaret McCarron, Marie Jo Medina, Doan Nguyen, Ai Ninomiya, Masatsugu Obuchi, Takato Odagiri, Malik Peiris, Michael L. Perdue, Jean Marc Reynes, James Robertson, Claudine Rousseaux, Takehiko Saito, Somchai Sangkitporn, Michael Shaw, James M. Simmerman, M. Slomka, Catherine Smith, San Sorn, Erica Spackman, Klaus Stöhr, David L. Suarez, Haan Woo Sung, David E. Swayne, Maryse Tardy-Panit, Masato Tashiro, Pranee Thawatsupha, Terrence Tumpey, Timothy Uyeki, Phan Van Tu, Sylvie Van Der Werf, Sirenda Vong, Richard Webby, Robert Webster, John Wood, Xiyan Xu, Guan Yi, Wenging Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) has recently spread to poultry in 9 Asian countries. H5N1 infections have caused ≥52 human deaths in Vietnam, Thailand, and Cambodia from January 2004 to April 2005. Genomic analyses of H5N1 isolates from birds and humans showed 2 distinct clades with a nonoverlapping geographic distribution. All the viral genes were of avian influenza origin, which indicates absence of reassortment with human influenza viruses. All human H5N1 isolates tested belonged to a single clade and were resistant to the adamantane drugs but sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. Most H5N1 isolates from humans were antigenically homogeneous and distinct from avian viruses circulating before the end of 2003. Some 2005 isolates showed evidence of antigenic drift. An updated nonpathogenic H5N1 reference virus, lacking the polybasic cleavage site in the hemagglutinin gene, was produced by reverse genetics in anticipation of the possible need to vaccinate humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1515-1521
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging infectious diseases
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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  • Cite this

    Aubin, J. T., Azebi, S., Balish, A., Banks, J., Bhat, N., Bright, R. A., Brown, I., Buchy, P., Burguiere, A. M., Chen, H. I., Cheng, P., Cox, N. J., Crosier, A., Curns, A., Cuvelier, F., Deng, G., Desheva, J., Desvaux, S., Diep, N. H., ... Zhang, W. (2005). Evolution of H5N1 avian influenza viruses in Asia. Emerging infectious diseases, 11(10), 1515-1521. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1110.050644