Evidence that accumulation of ceramides and cholesterol esters mediates oxidative stress - Induced death of motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Roy G. Cutler, Ward A. Pedersen, Simonetta Camandola, Jeffrey D. Rothstein, Mark P. Mattson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in progressive paralysis and death. The pathogenic mechanism of ALS is unknown but may involve increased oxidative stress, overactivation of glutamate receptors, and apoptosis. We report abnormalities in sphingolipid and cholesterol metabolism in the spinal cords of ALS patients and in a transgenic mouse model (Cu/ZnSOD mutant mice), which manifest increased levels of sphingomyelin, ceramides, and cholesterol esters; in the Cu/ZnSOD mutant mice, these abnormalities precede the clinical phenotype. In ALS patients and Cu/Zn-SOD mutant mice, increased oxidative stress occurs in association with the lipid alterations, and exposure of cultured motor neurons to oxidative stress increases the accumulation of sphingomyelin, ceramides, and cholesterol esters. Pharmacological inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis prevents accumulation of ceramides, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol esters and protects motor neurons against death induced by oxidative and excitotoxic insults. These findings suggest a pivotal role for altered sphingolipid metabolism in the pathogenesis of ALS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)448-457
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of neurology
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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