Evidence for widespread infection of wild rats with hepatitis E virus in the United States

Yamina Kabrane-Lazizi, Joshua B. Fine, Joe Elm, Gregory E. Glass, Harry Higa, Arwind Diwan, Clarence J. Gibbs, Xiang Jin Meng, Suzanne U. Emerson, Robert H. Purcell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatitis E is an important medical pathogen in many developing countries but is rarely reported from the United States, although antibody to hepatitis E virus (anti-HEV) is found in > 1% of U.S. citizens. Zoonotic spread of the virus is suspected. Sera obtained from 239 wild rats trapped in widely separated regions of the United States were tested for anti-HEV. Seventy-seven percent of rats from Maryland, 90% from Hawaii, and 44% from Louisiana were seropositive for anti-HEV. Rats from urban as well as rural areas were seropositive and the prevalence of anti-HEV IgG increased in parallel with the estimated age of the rats, leading to speculation that they might be involved in the puzzling high prevalence of anti-HEV among some U.S. city dwellers. The discovery of anti-HEV in rats in the United States and the recently reported discovery that HEV is endemic in U.S. swine raise many questions about transmission, reservoirs, and strains of HEV in developed countries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-335
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume61
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1999

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Hepatitis E virus
Antibodies
Infection
Hepatitis E
Zoonoses
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Swine
Immunoglobulin G
Viruses
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Kabrane-Lazizi, Y., Fine, J. B., Elm, J., Glass, G. E., Higa, H., Diwan, A., ... Purcell, R. H. (1999). Evidence for widespread infection of wild rats with hepatitis E virus in the United States. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 61(2), 331-335.

Evidence for widespread infection of wild rats with hepatitis E virus in the United States. / Kabrane-Lazizi, Yamina; Fine, Joshua B.; Elm, Joe; Glass, Gregory E.; Higa, Harry; Diwan, Arwind; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Meng, Xiang Jin; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Purcell, Robert H.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 61, No. 2, 08.1999, p. 331-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kabrane-Lazizi, Y, Fine, JB, Elm, J, Glass, GE, Higa, H, Diwan, A, Gibbs, CJ, Meng, XJ, Emerson, SU & Purcell, RH 1999, 'Evidence for widespread infection of wild rats with hepatitis E virus in the United States', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 331-335.
Kabrane-Lazizi Y, Fine JB, Elm J, Glass GE, Higa H, Diwan A et al. Evidence for widespread infection of wild rats with hepatitis E virus in the United States. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1999 Aug;61(2):331-335.
Kabrane-Lazizi, Yamina ; Fine, Joshua B. ; Elm, Joe ; Glass, Gregory E. ; Higa, Harry ; Diwan, Arwind ; Gibbs, Clarence J. ; Meng, Xiang Jin ; Emerson, Suzanne U. ; Purcell, Robert H. / Evidence for widespread infection of wild rats with hepatitis E virus in the United States. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1999 ; Vol. 61, No. 2. pp. 331-335.
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