Evaluation of the use of buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal in an emergency department

M. L. Berg, U. Idrees, R. Ding, S. A. Nesbit, H. K. Liang, M. L. McCarthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid withdrawal (OW) in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods: The medical records of all adult patients who presented to the study ED during a 10 week period for OW were abstracted. Subjects were categorized as receiving buprenorphine, symptomatic treatment or no pharmacologic treatment for their OW. The three groups were compared by patient and service characteristics, withdrawal symptoms and outcomes. Results: Of the 11,019 patients who presented to the ED during the 10 week study period, 158 (1.4%) were eligible. Subjects were more likely to receive buprenorphine (56%) compared to symptomatic treatment only (26%) or no pharmacologic treatment (18%). Subjects who received buprenorphine were more likely to have a history of suicide ideation (34% versus 12% p <0.05) compared to subjects who received symptomatic treatment(s) and were less likely to present with a gastrointestinal complaint (9% versus 25% p <0.05). Subjects who received buprenorphine were less likely to return to the same ED within 30 days for a drug-related visit (8%) compared to those who received symptomatic treatment (17%) (p <0.05). Conclusions: Buprenorphine was a common treatment for OW in this ED without any documented adverse outcomes. Given that it did not result in an increase in drug-related return ED visits and its proven efficacy in other settings, a prospective evaluation of its potential value to ED patients who present with OW is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-244
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume86
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 12 2007

Fingerprint

Buprenorphine
withdrawal
Opioid Analgesics
Hospital Emergency Service
evaluation
Therapeutics
drug
complaint
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
suicide
Suicide
Medical Records
Group

Keywords

  • Buprenorphine
  • Emergency department
  • Heroin
  • Opiate withdrawal
  • Opioid withdrawal
  • Prescription opioids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Berg, M. L., Idrees, U., Ding, R., Nesbit, S. A., Liang, H. K., & McCarthy, M. L. (2007). Evaluation of the use of buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal in an emergency department. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 86(2-3), 239-244. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2006.06.014

Evaluation of the use of buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal in an emergency department. / Berg, M. L.; Idrees, U.; Ding, R.; Nesbit, S. A.; Liang, H. K.; McCarthy, M. L.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 86, No. 2-3, 12.01.2007, p. 239-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berg, ML, Idrees, U, Ding, R, Nesbit, SA, Liang, HK & McCarthy, ML 2007, 'Evaluation of the use of buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal in an emergency department', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 86, no. 2-3, pp. 239-244. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2006.06.014
Berg, M. L. ; Idrees, U. ; Ding, R. ; Nesbit, S. A. ; Liang, H. K. ; McCarthy, M. L. / Evaluation of the use of buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal in an emergency department. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2007 ; Vol. 86, No. 2-3. pp. 239-244.
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