Evaluation of the patient D. imaging of rheumatologic diseases

William W. Scott, William J. Didie, Laura M Fayad

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Conventional radiographs are the initial imaging agent of choice for most rheumatic conditions. For most forms of arthritis, no additional imaging studies are required. Trabecular bone and small bone erosions are visualized well by conventional radiography. Weight-bearing views of the knees are important in the evaluation of significant knee osteoarthritis. Computed tomography (CT) is superior to conventional radiographs in the assessment of certain joint conditions, including many cases of tarsal coalition, sacroiliitis, osteonecrosis, and sternoclavicular joint disease. High resolution CT of the lungs is an essential adjunct to the evaluation of many inflammatory rheumatic diseases, for example, systemic sclerosis, systemic vasculitis, and other disorders associated with signs of interstitial lung disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has superior imaging capabilities of soft tissue and bone marrow lesions, is the study of choice for a host of musculoskeletal diagnoses, including meniscal tears of the knee, spinal disc herniations, osteonecrosis, osteomyelitis, skeletal neoplasms, and others. Bone densitometry plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of osteopenia and osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPrimer on the Rheumatic Diseases: Thirteenth Edition
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages28-41
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9780387356648
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Osteonecrosis
Knee
Sternoclavicular Joint
Tomography
Sacroiliitis
Bone and Bones
Systemic Vasculitis
Densitometry
Joint Diseases
Knee Osteoarthritis
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Systemic Scleroderma
Interstitial Lung Diseases
Weight-Bearing
Osteomyelitis
Rheumatic Diseases
Tears
Radiography
Osteoporosis
Arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Scott, W. W., Didie, W. J., & Fayad, L. M. (2008). Evaluation of the patient D. imaging of rheumatologic diseases. In Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases: Thirteenth Edition (pp. 28-41). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-68566-3_2

Evaluation of the patient D. imaging of rheumatologic diseases. / Scott, William W.; Didie, William J.; Fayad, Laura M.

Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases: Thirteenth Edition. Springer New York, 2008. p. 28-41.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Scott, WW, Didie, WJ & Fayad, LM 2008, Evaluation of the patient D. imaging of rheumatologic diseases. in Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases: Thirteenth Edition. Springer New York, pp. 28-41. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-68566-3_2
Scott WW, Didie WJ, Fayad LM. Evaluation of the patient D. imaging of rheumatologic diseases. In Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases: Thirteenth Edition. Springer New York. 2008. p. 28-41 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-68566-3_2
Scott, William W. ; Didie, William J. ; Fayad, Laura M. / Evaluation of the patient D. imaging of rheumatologic diseases. Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases: Thirteenth Edition. Springer New York, 2008. pp. 28-41
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