Evaluation of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination: spine questions.

Payam Farjoodi, A Jay Khanna, David R. Marker, Frank J. Frassica

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The annual Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE) is an objective evaluation administered annually to all residents by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. To our knowledge, there are no guidelines for the type of material included on the examination; therefore, it is difficult for many academic centers to develop education programs directed toward improving resident performance on the OITE. Our goals were to determine the most commonly tested subjects in the spine portion of the OITE and to help direct development of an associated teaching program. METHODS: We analyzed the number, type, anatomic focus, subject matter, and visual diagnostic modalities of spine questions on the OITEs from 2002 through 2007 and identified the most commonly referenced journals. RESULTS: The average annual number of spine questions was 23.1 (8.4% of the examination). The most common types of spine questions related to knowledge (44.5%), evaluation and decision making (29.1%), and diagnosis (26.3%); the most common subject matters were trauma (15.1%) and anatomy (13.7%). The most frequently examined anatomic locations were the cervical (30.9% of questions) and lumbar (17.4%) spines. General spine information (no anatomic focus) accounted for 31.6% of questions. The most commonly referenced journals were Spine and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume. CONCLUSIONS: Developing a study plan focusing on these journals and the most commonly tested topics and question types will better prepare orthopedic residents for the spine questions on the OITE. Copyright (c) 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-142
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume67
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Orthopedics
Spine
examination
evaluation
resident
surgery
teaching program
trauma
director
diagnostic
decision making
Anatomy
Decision Making
Teaching
Joints
Guidelines
Education
Bone and Bones
performance
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

Evaluation of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination : spine questions. / Farjoodi, Payam; Khanna, A Jay; Marker, David R.; Frassica, Frank J.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 67, No. 3, 05.2010, p. 139-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farjoodi, P, Khanna, AJ, Marker, DR & Frassica, FJ 2010, 'Evaluation of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination: spine questions.', Journal of Surgical Education, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 139-142.
Farjoodi, Payam ; Khanna, A Jay ; Marker, David R. ; Frassica, Frank J. / Evaluation of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination : spine questions. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2010 ; Vol. 67, No. 3. pp. 139-142.
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