Evaluation of the effectiveness of a problem-solving intervention addressing barriers to cardiovascular disease prevention behaviors in 3 underserved populations: Colorado, North Carolina, West Virginia, 2009

Christa L. Lilly, Lucinda L. Bryant, Janie M. Leary, Maihan B. Vu, Felicia Hill-Briggs, Carmen D. Samuel-Hodge, Colleen R. McMilin, Thomas C. Keyserling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: In low-income and underserved populations, financial hardship and multiple competing roles and responsibilities lead to difficulties in lifestyle change for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. To improve CVD prevention behaviors, we adapted, pilot-tested, and evaluated a problem-solving intervention designed to address barriers to lifestyle change. Methods: The sample consisted of 8l participants from 3 underserved populations, including 28 Hispanic or non-Hispanic white women in a western community (site l), 31 African-American women in a semirural southern community (site 2), and 22 adults in an Appalachian community (site 3). Incorporating focus group findings, we assessed a standardized interventio involving 6-to-8 week group sessions devoted to problem-solving in the fall of 2009. Results: Most sessions were attended by 76.5% of participants, demonstrating participant adoption and engagement. The intervention resulted in significant improvement in problem-solving skills (P ≤ .001) and perceived stress (P ≤ .05). Diet, physical activity, and weight remained stable, although 72% of individuals reported maintenance or increase in daily fruit and vegetable intake, and 67% reported maintenance or increase in daily physical activity.Conclusion: Study results suggest the intervention was acceptable to rural, underserved populations and effective in training them in problem-solving skills and stress management for CVD risk reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130249
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Vulnerable Populations
Cardiovascular Diseases
Life Style
Maintenance
Exercise
Rural Population
Risk Reduction Behavior
Poverty
Focus Groups
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Vegetables
Fruit
Diet
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

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Evaluation of the effectiveness of a problem-solving intervention addressing barriers to cardiovascular disease prevention behaviors in 3 underserved populations : Colorado, North Carolina, West Virginia, 2009. / Lilly, Christa L.; Bryant, Lucinda L.; Leary, Janie M.; Vu, Maihan B.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D.; McMilin, Colleen R.; Keyserling, Thomas C.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 11, No. 3, 130249, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lilly, Christa L. ; Bryant, Lucinda L. ; Leary, Janie M. ; Vu, Maihan B. ; Hill-Briggs, Felicia ; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D. ; McMilin, Colleen R. ; Keyserling, Thomas C. / Evaluation of the effectiveness of a problem-solving intervention addressing barriers to cardiovascular disease prevention behaviors in 3 underserved populations : Colorado, North Carolina, West Virginia, 2009. In: Preventing chronic disease. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 3.
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