Evaluation of the BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tubes compared with nonpreservative urine samples stored at 4°C and room temperature

Stephen W. Eisinger, Matthew Schwartz, Lisa Dam, Stefan Riedel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The stability of urine specimens submitted for culture remains a challenge for many laboratories because of delays in specimen transport. We evaluated the usefulness of BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube in ensuring specimen stability. Methods: Clinical urine specimens collected in sterile collection cups (n = 110) were plated onto sheep blood and MacConkey agar following standard laboratory procedures guidelines. Thereafter, specimens were divided into 3 storage conditions: nonpreservative, refrigerated; nonpreservative, room temperature (RT); BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube, RT. For each sample type, additional cultures were set up at 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours. Results: Initially, 18 specimens had no growth, 32 showed mixed skin flora, and 60 yielded at least 1 uropathogen. Increased colony counts of uropathogens were observed for nonpreserved urine samples stored at RT; these changes were statistically significant. Minor differences between refrigerated urine samples and BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube samples were seen but were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The use of preservative-containing collection tubes is desirable to ensure specimen stability when prompt processing or refrigeration is not feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-313
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume140
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Urine
Temperature
Refrigeration
Agar
Sheep
Guidelines
Skin
Growth

Keywords

  • BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tube
  • Specimen stability
  • Specimen transport
  • Urine culture
  • Urine specimen storage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation of the BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tubes compared with nonpreservative urine samples stored at 4°C and room temperature. / Eisinger, Stephen W.; Schwartz, Matthew; Dam, Lisa; Riedel, Stefan.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 140, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 306-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c230dc883922427180c0baaa6ddf62d3,
title = "Evaluation of the BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tubes compared with nonpreservative urine samples stored at 4°C and room temperature",
abstract = "Objectives: The stability of urine specimens submitted for culture remains a challenge for many laboratories because of delays in specimen transport. We evaluated the usefulness of BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube in ensuring specimen stability. Methods: Clinical urine specimens collected in sterile collection cups (n = 110) were plated onto sheep blood and MacConkey agar following standard laboratory procedures guidelines. Thereafter, specimens were divided into 3 storage conditions: nonpreservative, refrigerated; nonpreservative, room temperature (RT); BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube, RT. For each sample type, additional cultures were set up at 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours. Results: Initially, 18 specimens had no growth, 32 showed mixed skin flora, and 60 yielded at least 1 uropathogen. Increased colony counts of uropathogens were observed for nonpreserved urine samples stored at RT; these changes were statistically significant. Minor differences between refrigerated urine samples and BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube samples were seen but were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The use of preservative-containing collection tubes is desirable to ensure specimen stability when prompt processing or refrigeration is not feasible.",
keywords = "BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tube, Specimen stability, Specimen transport, Urine culture, Urine specimen storage",
author = "Eisinger, {Stephen W.} and Matthew Schwartz and Lisa Dam and Stefan Riedel",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1309/AJCP5ON9JHXVNQOD",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "140",
pages = "306--313",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Pathology",
issn = "0002-9173",
publisher = "American Society of Clinical Pathologists",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of the BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tubes compared with nonpreservative urine samples stored at 4°C and room temperature

AU - Eisinger, Stephen W.

AU - Schwartz, Matthew

AU - Dam, Lisa

AU - Riedel, Stefan

PY - 2013/9

Y1 - 2013/9

N2 - Objectives: The stability of urine specimens submitted for culture remains a challenge for many laboratories because of delays in specimen transport. We evaluated the usefulness of BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube in ensuring specimen stability. Methods: Clinical urine specimens collected in sterile collection cups (n = 110) were plated onto sheep blood and MacConkey agar following standard laboratory procedures guidelines. Thereafter, specimens were divided into 3 storage conditions: nonpreservative, refrigerated; nonpreservative, room temperature (RT); BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube, RT. For each sample type, additional cultures were set up at 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours. Results: Initially, 18 specimens had no growth, 32 showed mixed skin flora, and 60 yielded at least 1 uropathogen. Increased colony counts of uropathogens were observed for nonpreserved urine samples stored at RT; these changes were statistically significant. Minor differences between refrigerated urine samples and BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube samples were seen but were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The use of preservative-containing collection tubes is desirable to ensure specimen stability when prompt processing or refrigeration is not feasible.

AB - Objectives: The stability of urine specimens submitted for culture remains a challenge for many laboratories because of delays in specimen transport. We evaluated the usefulness of BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube in ensuring specimen stability. Methods: Clinical urine specimens collected in sterile collection cups (n = 110) were plated onto sheep blood and MacConkey agar following standard laboratory procedures guidelines. Thereafter, specimens were divided into 3 storage conditions: nonpreservative, refrigerated; nonpreservative, room temperature (RT); BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube, RT. For each sample type, additional cultures were set up at 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours. Results: Initially, 18 specimens had no growth, 32 showed mixed skin flora, and 60 yielded at least 1 uropathogen. Increased colony counts of uropathogens were observed for nonpreserved urine samples stored at RT; these changes were statistically significant. Minor differences between refrigerated urine samples and BD Vacutainer Plus Urine C&S Preservative Tube samples were seen but were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The use of preservative-containing collection tubes is desirable to ensure specimen stability when prompt processing or refrigeration is not feasible.

KW - BD vacutainer plus urine C&S preservative tube

KW - Specimen stability

KW - Specimen transport

KW - Urine culture

KW - Urine specimen storage

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84882755824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84882755824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1309/AJCP5ON9JHXVNQOD

DO - 10.1309/AJCP5ON9JHXVNQOD

M3 - Article

C2 - 23955448

AN - SCOPUS:84882755824

VL - 140

SP - 306

EP - 313

JO - American Journal of Clinical Pathology

JF - American Journal of Clinical Pathology

SN - 0002-9173

IS - 3

ER -