Evaluation of seasonal patterns of Kawasaki Syndrome- and rotavirus-associated hospitalizations in California and New York, 2000-2005

Adam MacNeil, Robert C. Holman, Krista L. Yorita, Claudia A. Steiner, Umesh D. Parashar, Ermias D. Belay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Kawasaki Syndrome (KS) is an uncommon childhood disease with unknown etiology. It has been suggested that rotavirus infection may play a causative role in the development of KS. Methods: To examine potential temporal associations between KS and rotavirus infection, seasonal patterns of KS- and rotavirus-associated hospitalizations among children in California and New York during 2000-2005 were compared. Results: Rotavirus hospital admissions were markedly winter seasonal, with very few summer hospitalizations. KS hospitalizations occurred year-round but also peaked slightly during winter and spring. Conclusion: The strong winter seasonal pattern of rotavirus clearly differed from the year-round pattern of KS hospitalizations. While the present study cannot completely rule out rotavirus as having a role in the development of KS, other agents must be involved in the etiology of KS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number65
Number of pages1
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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