Evaluation of risks associated with short-and long-term psychostimulant therapy for treatment of ADHD in children

Todd Kociancic, Michael D. Reed, Robert L. Findling

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common condition during childhood that is associated with significant psychosocial dysfunction. Psychostimulants are the compounds that have been most extensively studied for the treatment of ADHD in children. There is substantial scientific evidence that several methylphenidate- and amphetamine-based preparations have acute efficacy in the treatment of this condition in children. The short-term safety and tolerability of these compounds has been reasonably well-studied and the risks associated with psychostimulant therapy in the short-term are generally acceptable. However, the amount of long-term effectiveness and safety data relating to these compounds is relatively small. Data that do exist suggest that long-term treatment with psychostimulants in appropriately diagnosed patients may be associated with salutary effects as well as relatively modest risks. Until more extensive, methodologically rigorous data are available, it appears that judicious psychostimulant pharmacotherapy of ADHD in children may be justified. 2004

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-100
Number of pages8
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Safety
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amphetamine
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Methylphenidate (MPH)
  • Stimulants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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