Evaluation of lactate as a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy index for noninvasive prediction and early detection of tumor response to radiation therapy in EMT6 tumors

Eric O. Aboagye, Zaver M. Bhujwalla, Qiuhong He, Jerry D. Glickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a recent study (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 36, 635639, 1996), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to demonstrate significant decreases in lactate levels after γ irradiation of radiosensitive RIF-1 tumors in vitro. For comparison, we have examined the effects of γ radiation on lactate levels in the more radioresistant EMT6 tumor. Single-slice (5-6 mm thick) localized 1H spectra of subcutaneous RIF- 1 (untreated) and EMT6 tumors (pretreatment, 24 and 48 h postirradiation with 4, 10 or 20 Gy of γ radiation) were measured by the selective multiple quantum coherence transfer method (Sel-MQC, -4 min acquisition time). Both pretreatment lactate levels and pretreatment lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were found to be similar in RIF-1 and EMT6 tumors, suggesting that steady-state lactate levels are unlikely to be reliable indices for predicting response to radiation therapy. After 10 Gy γ irradiation, EMT6 tumors showed a 21% decrease relative to pretreatment lactate levels at 48 h (1.04 ± 0.22 to 0.82 ± 0.16; P = 0.06); after 20 Gy a 40% decrease was observed at 48 h (1.34 ± 0.27 to 0.81 ± 0.10; P = 0.07). No significant changes in lactate levels were observed in control EMT6 tumors or in tumors treated with 4 Gy of γ radiation, in contrast to changes detected previously in RIF-1 tumors, which showed a significant decrease in lactate by 48 h for both 2 and 4 Gy. The decreased effect of radiation on lactate levels in EMT6 compared to RIF-1 tumors may be attributed to the higher hypoxic fraction and lower radiosensitivity of EMT6 tumors (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 10, 695-712, 1984). The decrease in lactate levels did not, however, strictly reflect the extent of the response to therapy for the high dose of 20 Gy. This study together with our earlier study (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 36, 635-639, 1996) provides evidence to support the hypothesis that changes in steady-state tumor lactate levels may serve as sensitive early indices of tumor response to γ radiation at doses of the order of 2 to 4 Gy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalRadiation research
Volume150
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiation
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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