Evaluation of a bladder cancer cluster in a population of criminal investigators with the bureau of alcohol, tobacco, firearms and explosives - Part 2: The association of cancer risk and fire scene investigation

Susan R. Davis, Xuguang Tao, Edward J. Bernacki, Amy S. Alfriend, Mark E. Delowery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study evaluated the association of bladder cancer risk and fire scene investigation within a cohort of white male criminal investigators with the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives that was found to be at increased risk for bladder cancer. Medical surveillance data were used in a nested case-control study to determine odds ratios (ORs) estimating the relative risk of the cancer associated with post-fire investigation. The study comprised seven bladder cancer cases and 1525 controls. Six of the cases reported holding assignments associated with post-fire investigation. The OR for bladder cancer was 19.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.94-186.39) for those holding any one or more of these assignments for one to four years versus zero years and 12.56 (1.14-138.58) for those holding any one or more of these assignments for five or more years versus zero years. The risk for bladder cancer is significantly elevated for those holding post-fire investigation assignments compared to those not holding these assignments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number986023
JournalJournal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluation of a bladder cancer cluster in a population of criminal investigators with the bureau of alcohol, tobacco, firearms and explosives - Part 2: The association of cancer risk and fire scene investigation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this