Evaluation for colon cancer in patients with occult fecal blood loss while taking aspirin: A Bayesian viewpoint

P. Doubilet, Mark Donowitz, S. G. Pauker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines the implications of occult fecal blood loss in patients taking aspirin (at least 2 grams daily). Although such patients do have a somewhat higher probability of colonic carcinoma than do members of the general population, their risk is far lower than that of patients who have gastrointestinal blood loss when not taking aspirin. This difference in risk exists because aspirin itself can provoke occult blood loss in stool. Patients who manifest gastrointestal blood loss while taking aspirin can be separated into two groups, based on whether or not that blood loss continues after aspirin is discontinued. Although patients who continue to bleed are at high risk for colonic carcinoma, those who cease having any blood loss are at lower risk than are membrane of the general population. Further diagnostic studies to detect colonic carcinoma should be pursued in the former group, but not in the latter, low-risk group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-160
Number of pages14
JournalMedical Decision Making
Volume2
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Occult Blood
Colonic Neoplasms
Aspirin
Carcinoma
Population
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Evaluation for colon cancer in patients with occult fecal blood loss while taking aspirin : A Bayesian viewpoint. / Doubilet, P.; Donowitz, Mark; Pauker, S. G.

In: Medical Decision Making, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1982, p. 147-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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