Evaluating the utility of the modified cigarette evaluation questionnaire and cigarette purchase task for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy of cigarettes varying in nicotine content

Cecilia L. Bergeria, Sarah H. Heil, Danielle R. Davis, Joanna M. Streck, Stacey C. Sigmon, Janice Y. Bunn, Jennifer W. Tidey, Chris A. Arger, Derek D. Reed, Thomas Gallagher, John R. Hughes, Diann E. Gaalema, Maxine L Stitzer, Stephen T. Higgins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Nicotine is the addictive component in cigarettes that maintain cigarette smoking that subsequently leads to morbidity and mortality. Methods for assessing the abuse liability of cigarettes are essential to inform new tobacco product standards. This secondary analysis evaluated the utility of one subjective effects measure, the modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire (mCEQ), and one behavioral economic task, the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT), for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy measured by concurrent choice Self-Administration (SA). Methods: Smokers (N = 169) belonging to one of three vulnerable populations participated in a multi-site, double-blind study evaluating research cigarettes with varying levels of nicotine (0.4, 2.4, 5.2, 15.8 mg/g). Participants sampled cigarettes and completed the mCEQ and CPT. In subsequent sessions, cigarette preference was assessed using a concurrent choice SA procedure. Mixed-model repeated measures analysis of variance tests were used to evaluate the utility of the mCEQ subscales and CPT indices for predicting preference for the higher compared to lower nicotine content cigarettes. In addition, stepwise regressions were used to determine which subscales and indices independently predicted concurrent choice SA. Results: Greater increases on the Satisfaction and Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations mCEQ subscales independently predicted higher dose preference in concurrent choice testing. Elasticity was the only CPT index that predicted choice. However, its predictive utility differed by dose among opioid-maintained individuals. Conclusion: The mCEQ and CPT predict behavioral measures of relative reinforcing efficacy as assessed in concurrent choice SA, with the mCEQ Satisfaction and Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations subscales being the strongest independent predictors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-64
Number of pages9
JournalDrug and alcohol dependence
Volume197
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Nicotine
Tobacco Products
Self Administration
Surveys and Questionnaires
Respiratory System
Behavioral Economics
Elasticity
Vulnerable Populations
Double-Blind Method
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Opioid Analgesics

Keywords

  • Abuse liability
  • Addiction potential
  • Nicotine content
  • Purchase tasks
  • Self-administration
  • Subjective effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Evaluating the utility of the modified cigarette evaluation questionnaire and cigarette purchase task for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy of cigarettes varying in nicotine content. / Bergeria, Cecilia L.; Heil, Sarah H.; Davis, Danielle R.; Streck, Joanna M.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Bunn, Janice Y.; Tidey, Jennifer W.; Arger, Chris A.; Reed, Derek D.; Gallagher, Thomas; Hughes, John R.; Gaalema, Diann E.; Stitzer, Maxine L; Higgins, Stephen T.

In: Drug and alcohol dependence, Vol. 197, 01.04.2019, p. 56-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bergeria, Cecilia L. ; Heil, Sarah H. ; Davis, Danielle R. ; Streck, Joanna M. ; Sigmon, Stacey C. ; Bunn, Janice Y. ; Tidey, Jennifer W. ; Arger, Chris A. ; Reed, Derek D. ; Gallagher, Thomas ; Hughes, John R. ; Gaalema, Diann E. ; Stitzer, Maxine L ; Higgins, Stephen T. / Evaluating the utility of the modified cigarette evaluation questionnaire and cigarette purchase task for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy of cigarettes varying in nicotine content. In: Drug and alcohol dependence. 2019 ; Vol. 197. pp. 56-64.
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abstract = "Background: Nicotine is the addictive component in cigarettes that maintain cigarette smoking that subsequently leads to morbidity and mortality. Methods for assessing the abuse liability of cigarettes are essential to inform new tobacco product standards. This secondary analysis evaluated the utility of one subjective effects measure, the modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire (mCEQ), and one behavioral economic task, the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT), for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy measured by concurrent choice Self-Administration (SA). Methods: Smokers (N = 169) belonging to one of three vulnerable populations participated in a multi-site, double-blind study evaluating research cigarettes with varying levels of nicotine (0.4, 2.4, 5.2, 15.8 mg/g). Participants sampled cigarettes and completed the mCEQ and CPT. In subsequent sessions, cigarette preference was assessed using a concurrent choice SA procedure. Mixed-model repeated measures analysis of variance tests were used to evaluate the utility of the mCEQ subscales and CPT indices for predicting preference for the higher compared to lower nicotine content cigarettes. In addition, stepwise regressions were used to determine which subscales and indices independently predicted concurrent choice SA. Results: Greater increases on the Satisfaction and Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations mCEQ subscales independently predicted higher dose preference in concurrent choice testing. Elasticity was the only CPT index that predicted choice. However, its predictive utility differed by dose among opioid-maintained individuals. Conclusion: The mCEQ and CPT predict behavioral measures of relative reinforcing efficacy as assessed in concurrent choice SA, with the mCEQ Satisfaction and Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations subscales being the strongest independent predictors.",
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T1 - Evaluating the utility of the modified cigarette evaluation questionnaire and cigarette purchase task for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy of cigarettes varying in nicotine content

AU - Bergeria, Cecilia L.

AU - Heil, Sarah H.

AU - Davis, Danielle R.

AU - Streck, Joanna M.

AU - Sigmon, Stacey C.

AU - Bunn, Janice Y.

AU - Tidey, Jennifer W.

AU - Arger, Chris A.

AU - Reed, Derek D.

AU - Gallagher, Thomas

AU - Hughes, John R.

AU - Gaalema, Diann E.

AU - Stitzer, Maxine L

AU - Higgins, Stephen T.

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Background: Nicotine is the addictive component in cigarettes that maintain cigarette smoking that subsequently leads to morbidity and mortality. Methods for assessing the abuse liability of cigarettes are essential to inform new tobacco product standards. This secondary analysis evaluated the utility of one subjective effects measure, the modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire (mCEQ), and one behavioral economic task, the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT), for predicting acute relative reinforcing efficacy measured by concurrent choice Self-Administration (SA). Methods: Smokers (N = 169) belonging to one of three vulnerable populations participated in a multi-site, double-blind study evaluating research cigarettes with varying levels of nicotine (0.4, 2.4, 5.2, 15.8 mg/g). Participants sampled cigarettes and completed the mCEQ and CPT. In subsequent sessions, cigarette preference was assessed using a concurrent choice SA procedure. Mixed-model repeated measures analysis of variance tests were used to evaluate the utility of the mCEQ subscales and CPT indices for predicting preference for the higher compared to lower nicotine content cigarettes. In addition, stepwise regressions were used to determine which subscales and indices independently predicted concurrent choice SA. Results: Greater increases on the Satisfaction and Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations mCEQ subscales independently predicted higher dose preference in concurrent choice testing. Elasticity was the only CPT index that predicted choice. However, its predictive utility differed by dose among opioid-maintained individuals. Conclusion: The mCEQ and CPT predict behavioral measures of relative reinforcing efficacy as assessed in concurrent choice SA, with the mCEQ Satisfaction and Enjoyment of Respiratory Tract Sensations subscales being the strongest independent predictors.

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KW - Addiction potential

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