Evaluating the impact of mandatory public reporting on participation and performance in a program to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections: Evidence from a national patient safety collaborative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background It is not clear whether mandatory reporting influences the efforts and performance of hospitals to prevent hospital-acquired infections. This study examines whether mandatory reporting impacted participation and performance in reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in a national patient safety collaborative. Methods We analyzed 1,046 adult intensive care units (ICUs) participating in the national On the CUSP: Stop BSI program. We used a difference-in-difference approach to compare changes in CLABSI rates in states with no public reporting mandate, recent mandates, and longer-standing mandates. Chi-square tests were used to examine the differences in the participation rate. Results States enacting a law requiring mandatory public reporting of CLABSI rates around the time of the national program had the highest hospital participation rates (approximately 50%). Compared with units in states with no reporting requirement, units in the states with voluntary reporting systems or with longer periods of mandatory reporting experience had higher CLABSI rates at baseline and greater reductions in CLABSI in the first 6 months. State groups with mandatory public reporting of CLABSI showed a trend toward greater reduction in CLABSI after 1 year of program implementation. Conclusion Mandatory reporting requirements may spark hospitals to turn to proven infection prevention interventions to improve CLABSI rates. Reporting requirements do not teach sites how to reduce rates. ICUs need both motivation and facilitation to reach consumer expectations for infection prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S209-S215
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • Central line-associated bloodstream infections
  • Health policy Mandatory reporting Comprehensive
  • Hospital-acquired infections
  • Nosocomial infection
  • Program
  • Safety
  • Unit-based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy

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