Evaluating real-time effects of topical 1:1000 epinephrine in endoscopic sinus and skull-base surgery on hemodynamic parameters through intraoperative arterial line monitoring

Michael T. Yim, Omar Ahmed, Masayoshi Takashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Administration of topical 1:1000 epinephrine is commonly used in practice to achieve vasoconstriction during endoscopic sinus surgery and skull-base surgery; however, real-time effects on cardiovascular changes from systemic absorption have not been well studied. Methods: Twenty-six patients undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary lesion at a single institution were included into the study. Following arterial line placement by anesthesiology, 6 cottonoid pledgets soaked in 1:1000 epinephrine were placed into the bilateral nasal passages. Hemodynamic parameters including heart rate, blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure were collected at baseline, 30 seconds, and increments in minutes up to 10 minutes. Additional potentially confounding factors such as use of antihypertensives, stress dose steroids, and positioning with head pins were all performed following termination of data collection. Results: The majority of patients (20/26, 77%) showed no significant change in any parameter following placement of epinephrine soaked cottonoids. Six patients, however, had transient increases in blood pressure following administration of topical epinephrine, with a few requiring vasodilatory interventions. Return to baseline cardiovascular values were noted after an average of 7 minutes. There was no correlative preoperative characteristic that predicted sensitivity to placement of epinephrine. There were no lasting or permanent effects. Conclusion: Although intranasal topical 1:1000 epinephrine use showed no substantial hemodynamic changes in the majority of patients, in a subset of patients it can cause significant transient elevations in blood pressure to a degree necessitating intervention. Topical epinephrine should be used judiciously in endoscopic sinus surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1065-1069
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Forum of Allergy and Rhinology
Volume7
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vascular Access Devices
Skull Base
Epinephrine
Hemodynamics
Topical Administration
Blood Pressure
Anesthesiology
Vasoconstriction
Nose
Antihypertensive Agents
Arterial Pressure
Heart Rate
Steroids
Head

Keywords

  • hemostasis
  • hypertension
  • nasal surgery
  • otolaryngology
  • sinus surgery
  • skull base surgery
  • topical epinephrine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "Evaluating real-time effects of topical 1:1000 epinephrine in endoscopic sinus and skull-base surgery on hemodynamic parameters through intraoperative arterial line monitoring",
abstract = "Background: Administration of topical 1:1000 epinephrine is commonly used in practice to achieve vasoconstriction during endoscopic sinus surgery and skull-base surgery; however, real-time effects on cardiovascular changes from systemic absorption have not been well studied. Methods: Twenty-six patients undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary lesion at a single institution were included into the study. Following arterial line placement by anesthesiology, 6 cottonoid pledgets soaked in 1:1000 epinephrine were placed into the bilateral nasal passages. Hemodynamic parameters including heart rate, blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure were collected at baseline, 30 seconds, and increments in minutes up to 10 minutes. Additional potentially confounding factors such as use of antihypertensives, stress dose steroids, and positioning with head pins were all performed following termination of data collection. Results: The majority of patients (20/26, 77{\%}) showed no significant change in any parameter following placement of epinephrine soaked cottonoids. Six patients, however, had transient increases in blood pressure following administration of topical epinephrine, with a few requiring vasodilatory interventions. Return to baseline cardiovascular values were noted after an average of 7 minutes. There was no correlative preoperative characteristic that predicted sensitivity to placement of epinephrine. There were no lasting or permanent effects. Conclusion: Although intranasal topical 1:1000 epinephrine use showed no substantial hemodynamic changes in the majority of patients, in a subset of patients it can cause significant transient elevations in blood pressure to a degree necessitating intervention. Topical epinephrine should be used judiciously in endoscopic sinus surgery.",
keywords = "hemostasis, hypertension, nasal surgery, otolaryngology, sinus surgery, skull base surgery, topical epinephrine",
author = "Yim, {Michael T.} and Omar Ahmed and Masayoshi Takashima",
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AU - Ahmed, Omar

AU - Takashima, Masayoshi

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N2 - Background: Administration of topical 1:1000 epinephrine is commonly used in practice to achieve vasoconstriction during endoscopic sinus surgery and skull-base surgery; however, real-time effects on cardiovascular changes from systemic absorption have not been well studied. Methods: Twenty-six patients undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary lesion at a single institution were included into the study. Following arterial line placement by anesthesiology, 6 cottonoid pledgets soaked in 1:1000 epinephrine were placed into the bilateral nasal passages. Hemodynamic parameters including heart rate, blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure were collected at baseline, 30 seconds, and increments in minutes up to 10 minutes. Additional potentially confounding factors such as use of antihypertensives, stress dose steroids, and positioning with head pins were all performed following termination of data collection. Results: The majority of patients (20/26, 77%) showed no significant change in any parameter following placement of epinephrine soaked cottonoids. Six patients, however, had transient increases in blood pressure following administration of topical epinephrine, with a few requiring vasodilatory interventions. Return to baseline cardiovascular values were noted after an average of 7 minutes. There was no correlative preoperative characteristic that predicted sensitivity to placement of epinephrine. There were no lasting or permanent effects. Conclusion: Although intranasal topical 1:1000 epinephrine use showed no substantial hemodynamic changes in the majority of patients, in a subset of patients it can cause significant transient elevations in blood pressure to a degree necessitating intervention. Topical epinephrine should be used judiciously in endoscopic sinus surgery.

AB - Background: Administration of topical 1:1000 epinephrine is commonly used in practice to achieve vasoconstriction during endoscopic sinus surgery and skull-base surgery; however, real-time effects on cardiovascular changes from systemic absorption have not been well studied. Methods: Twenty-six patients undergoing endoscopic transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary lesion at a single institution were included into the study. Following arterial line placement by anesthesiology, 6 cottonoid pledgets soaked in 1:1000 epinephrine were placed into the bilateral nasal passages. Hemodynamic parameters including heart rate, blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure were collected at baseline, 30 seconds, and increments in minutes up to 10 minutes. Additional potentially confounding factors such as use of antihypertensives, stress dose steroids, and positioning with head pins were all performed following termination of data collection. Results: The majority of patients (20/26, 77%) showed no significant change in any parameter following placement of epinephrine soaked cottonoids. Six patients, however, had transient increases in blood pressure following administration of topical epinephrine, with a few requiring vasodilatory interventions. Return to baseline cardiovascular values were noted after an average of 7 minutes. There was no correlative preoperative characteristic that predicted sensitivity to placement of epinephrine. There were no lasting or permanent effects. Conclusion: Although intranasal topical 1:1000 epinephrine use showed no substantial hemodynamic changes in the majority of patients, in a subset of patients it can cause significant transient elevations in blood pressure to a degree necessitating intervention. Topical epinephrine should be used judiciously in endoscopic sinus surgery.

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