Evaluating Barriers to Bystander CPR among Laypersons before and after Compression-only CPR Training

Andrew J. Bouland, Megan H. Halliday, Angela C. Comer, Matthew J. Levy, Kevin G. Seaman, Benjamin J. Lawner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Bystander CPR is an essential part of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. EMS and public safety jurisdictions have embraced initiatives to teach compression-only CPR to laypersons in order to increase rates of bystander CPR. We examined barriers to bystander CPR amongst laypersons participating in community compression-only CPR training and the ability of the training to alleviate these barriers. The barriers analyzed include fear of litigation, risk of disease transmission, fear of hurting someone as a result of doing CPR when unnecessary, and fear of hurting someone as a result of doing CPR incorrectly. Methods: Laypersons attending community compression-only CPR training were administered surveys before and after community CPR training. Data were analyzed via standard statistical analyses. Results: A total of 238 surveys were collected and analyzed between September 2015 and January 2016. The most common reported motivation for attending CPR training was “to be prepared/just in case” followed by “infant or child at home.” Respondents reported that they were significantly more likely to perform CPR on a family member than a stranger in both pre-and post-training responses. Nevertheless, reported self-confidence in and likelihood of doing CPR on both family and strangers increased from pre-training to post-training. There was a statistically significant decrease in reported likelihood of all four barriers to prevent respondents from performing bystander CPR when pre-training responses were compared to post-training responses. Previous CPR training and history of having witnessed a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) were both associated with decreased barriers to CPR, but previous training had no effect on reported likelihood of or confidence in performing CPR. Conclusion: The training initiative studied significantly reduced the reported likelihood of all barriers studied to prevent respondents from performing bystander CPR and also increased the reported confidence in doing CPR and likelihood of doing CPR on both strangers and family. However, it did not alleviate the pre-training discrepancy between likelihood of performing CPR on strangers versus family. Previous CPR training or certification had no impact on likelihood of or confidence in performing CPR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-669
Number of pages8
JournalPrehospital Emergency Care
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2017

Keywords

  • CPR
  • EMS
  • bystander CPR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency

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