Ethnoecology In Pre-Hispanic Central America: Foodways And Human-Plant Interfaces

Shanti Morell-Hart, Rosemary A. Joyce, John S. Henderson, Rachel Cane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In recent years, researchers in pre-Hispanic Central America have used new approaches that greatly amplify and enhance evidence of plants and their uses. This paper presents a case study from Puerto Escondido, located in the lower Uluá River valley of Caribbean coastal Honduras. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using multiple methods in concert to interpret ethnobotanical practice in the past. By examining chipped-stone tools, ceramics, sediments from artifact contexts, and macrobotanical remains, we advance complementary inquiries. Here, we address botanical practices "in the home," such as foodways, medicinal practices, fiber crafting, and ritual activities, and those "close to home," such as agricultural and horticultural practices, forest management, and other engagements with local and distant ecologies. This presents an opportunity to begin to develop an understanding of ethnoecology at Puerto Escondido, here defined as the dynamic relationship between affordances provided in a botanical landscape and the impacts of human activities on that botanical landscape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAncient Mesoamerica
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Central America
ceramics
forest management
artifact
human activity
ecology
valley
Honduras
concert
river
sediment
religious behavior
Botany
Foodways
Prehispanic
management
evidence
stone
method
fibre

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Ethnoecology In Pre-Hispanic Central America : Foodways And Human-Plant Interfaces. / Morell-Hart, Shanti; Joyce, Rosemary A.; Henderson, John S.; Cane, Rachel.

In: Ancient Mesoamerica, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morell-Hart, Shanti ; Joyce, Rosemary A. ; Henderson, John S. ; Cane, Rachel. / Ethnoecology In Pre-Hispanic Central America : Foodways And Human-Plant Interfaces. In: Ancient Mesoamerica. 2019.
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