Ethnic differences in prevalence and barriers of HBV screening and vaccination among Asian Americans

Carol Strong, Sunmin Lee, Miho Tanaka, Hee Soon Juon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Our study identifies the prevalence of HBV virus (HBV) screening and vaccination among Asian Americans, and ethnic differences for factors associated with screening and vaccination behaviors. in 2009-2010 we recruited 877 Korean, Chinese, and Vietnamese Americans 18 years of age and above through several community organizations, churches and local ethnic businesses in Maryland for a health education intervention and a self-administered survey. Prevalence of HBV screening, screening result and vaccinations were compared by each ethnic group. We used logistic regression analysis to understand how sociodemographics, familial factors, patient-, provider-, and resourcerelated barriers are associated with screening and vaccination behaviors, using the total sample and separate analysis for each ethnic group. Forty-seven percent of participants reported that they had received HBV screening and 38% had received vaccinations. Among the three groups, the Chinese participants had the highest screening prevalence, but lowest self-reported infection rate; Vietnamese has the lowest screening and vaccination prevalence. in multivariate analysis, having better knowledge of HBV, and family and physician recommendations was significantly associated with screening and vaccination behaviors. immigrants who had lived in the US for more than a quarter of their lifetime were less likely to report ever having been screened (OR - 0.39, 95% Ci: 0.28-0.55) or vaccinated (OR - 0.62,95% Ci: 0.44-0.88). in ethnic-specific analysis, having a regular physician (OR - 4.46, 95% Ci: 1.62-12.25) and doctor's recommendation (OR - 2.11, 95% Ci: 1.05-4.22) are significantly associated with Korean's vaccination behaviors. Health insurance was associated with vaccination behaviors only among Vietnamese (OR - 2.66, 95% Ci: 1.21-5.83), but not among others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1071-1080
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

HBV
Asian Americans
vaccination
Vaccination
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
church organization
physician
sociodemographic factors
Family Physicians
Health Insurance
Health Education
health insurance
multivariate analysis
health promotion
regression analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
logistics

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • HBV infection
  • HBV prevalence
  • Health care access barriers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Ethnic differences in prevalence and barriers of HBV screening and vaccination among Asian Americans. / Strong, Carol; Lee, Sunmin; Tanaka, Miho; Juon, Hee Soon.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 37, No. 5, 10.2012, p. 1071-1080.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strong, Carol ; Lee, Sunmin ; Tanaka, Miho ; Juon, Hee Soon. / Ethnic differences in prevalence and barriers of HBV screening and vaccination among Asian Americans. In: Journal of Community Health. 2012 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 1071-1080.
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