Ethical conflicts reported by Certified Nephrology Nurses (CNNs) practicing in dialysis settings.

B. K. Redman, M. N. Hill, S. T. Fry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the investigators was to describe and classify ethical conflicts experienced by Certified Nephrology Nurses (CNNs) practicing in dialysis settings in four eastern states and the District of Columbia, and to explore associated demographic, educational, and practice setting factors associated with these ethical conflicts. DESIGN: A descriptive survey design was used. SAMPLE/SETTING: All members of the American Nephrology Nurses Association (ANNA) who were CNNs working in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, and a random sample of those in New York State and Pennsylvania were contacted. METHODS: Those CNNs working in dialysis settings were asked to complete the Demographic Data Form and the Moral Conflict Questionnaire developed by Fry (1990). Eighty-eight met inclusion criteria, agreed to participate, and described ethical conflicts. RESULTS: By far the most common practice context for the described ethical conflicts were decisions about discontinuation or initiation of dialysis (69%). Participants were clear about the moral problem and ethical principles involved. CONCLUSIONS: Participants reported being involved in serious ethical conflicts about patient care. Since two-thirds were not resolved, further research should investigate whether existing mechanisms in practice settings for resolution of ethical conflicts are not working or are not being used by nurses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-31, discussion 32-33
JournalANNA journal / American Nephrology Nurses' Association
Volume24
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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