Estrogen receptors in the human prostate, seminal vesicle, epididymis, testis, and genital skin: A marker for estrogen-responsive tissues?

Joseph B. Murphy, R. Cameron Emmott, L. Louise Hicks, Patrick C. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In an effort to identify those human male sex accessory tissues that may be under the physiological influence of estrogen, cytosolic and nuclear estrogen receptors were measured with two ligand systems that used either [3H]R2858 [moxesterol(1β-methoxy-17-ethynyl-1, 3, 5, (10) -estratriene-3, 17β- diol)] or [3H]estradiol plus 1 jiiM dihydrotestosterone with diethylstilbestrol to correct for nonspecific binding. In seminal vesicles, high affinity binding was identified in cytosol (6 of 7 determinations) and nuclear extract (4 of 7 determinations); in the epididymis, high affinity binding was also present in the cytosol (10 of 12 determinations) and nuclear extract (10 of 11 determinations). In contrast, no high affinity binding was demonstrated in cytosol from the testis (0 of 5 determinations) or genital skin (0 of 7 determinations), and only low levels of nuclear receptor (80 fmol/g tissue) were present in the testis (3 of 5 determinations) and genital skin (1 of 7 determinations). In nonhyperplastic prostatic tissue, high affinity binding was present [in the cytosol of periurethral zone tissue (3 of 7 determinations) and nuclear extract (1 of 7 determinations), in cytosol of peripheral zone tissue (7 of 8 determinations) and nuclear extract (4 of 7 determinations), and in prostatic carcinoma cytosol (5 of 12 determinations) and nuclear extract (10 of 13 determinations)]. In contrast, no high affinity binding was present in either cytosol or nuclear extract from benign hyperplastic prostatic tissue. The finding of estrogen receptors in the human epididymis, seminal vesicle, and prostatic carcinoma suggests that estrogen, in addition to androgen, may act in the physiological regulation of these organs. However, the direct role of estrogen in the induction and maintenance of benign prostatic hyperplasia remains to be defined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)938-948
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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