Estimating the probabilities of rare arrhythmic events in multiscale computational models of cardiac cells and tissue

Mark A. Walker, Viatcheslav Gurev, John J. Rice, Joseph L. Greenstein, Raimond Winslow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ectopic heartbeats can trigger reentrant arrhythmias, leading to ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Such events have been attributed to perturbed Ca2+handling in cardiac myocytes leading to spontaneous Ca2+release and delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs). However, the ways in which perturbation of specific molecular mechanisms alters the probability of ectopic beats is not understood. We present a multiscale model of cardiac tissue incorporating a biophysically detailed three-dimensional model of the ventricular myocyte. This model reproduces realistic Ca2+waves and DADs driven by stochastic Ca2+release channel (RyR) gating and is used to study mechanisms of DAD variability. In agreement with previous experimental and modeling studies, key factors influencing the distribution of DAD amplitude and timing include cytosolic and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+concentrations, inwardly rectifying potassium current (IK1) density, and gap junction conductance. The cardiac tissue model is used to investigate how random RyR gating gives rise to probabilistic triggered activity in a one-dimensional myocyte tissue model. A novel spatial-average filtering method for estimating the probability of extreme (i.e. rare, high-amplitude) stochastic events from a limited set of spontaneous Ca2+release profiles is presented. These events occur when randomly organized clusters of cells exhibit synchronized, high amplitude Ca2+release flux. It is shown how reduced IK1density and gap junction coupling, as observed in heart failure, increase the probability of extreme DADs by multiple orders of magnitude. This method enables prediction of arrhythmia likelihood and its modulation by alterations of other cellular mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1005783
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Multiscale Model
Cardiac
Computational Model
Gap Junctions
Tissue
calcium
Muscle Cells
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Cell
Premature Cardiac Complexes
Gap Junction
Myocytes
Sudden Cardiac Death
Sarcoplasmic Reticulum
Ventricular Fibrillation
cells
Arrhythmia
gap junctions
Cardiac Myocytes
arrhythmia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Estimating the probabilities of rare arrhythmic events in multiscale computational models of cardiac cells and tissue. / Walker, Mark A.; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Rice, John J.; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Winslow, Raimond.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 13, No. 11, e1005783, 01.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, Mark A. ; Gurev, Viatcheslav ; Rice, John J. ; Greenstein, Joseph L. ; Winslow, Raimond. / Estimating the probabilities of rare arrhythmic events in multiscale computational models of cardiac cells and tissue. In: PLoS Computational Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 11.
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