Estimating the Economic Value of Information for Screening in Disseminating and Targeting Effective School-based Preventive Interventions: An Illustrative Example

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

When candidates for school-based preventive interventions are heterogeneous in their risk of poor outcomes, an intervention’s expected economic net benefits may be maximized by targeting candidates for whom the intervention is most likely to yield benefits, such as those at high risk of poor outcomes. Although increasing amounts of information about candidates may facilitate more accurate targeting, collecting information can be costly. We present an illustrative example to show how cost-benefit analysis results from effective intervention demonstrations can help us to assess whether improved targeting accuracy justifies the cost of collecting additional information needed to make this improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 8 2017

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Economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Cost-benefit
  • Implementation
  • Information
  • Prevention
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Estimating the Economic Value of Information for Screening in Disseminating and Targeting Effective School-based Preventive Interventions: An Illustrative Example",
abstract = "When candidates for school-based preventive interventions are heterogeneous in their risk of poor outcomes, an intervention’s expected economic net benefits may be maximized by targeting candidates for whom the intervention is most likely to yield benefits, such as those at high risk of poor outcomes. Although increasing amounts of information about candidates may facilitate more accurate targeting, collecting information can be costly. We present an illustrative example to show how cost-benefit analysis results from effective intervention demonstrations can help us to assess whether improved targeting accuracy justifies the cost of collecting additional information needed to make this improvement.",
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AU - Slade, Eric

AU - Stuart, Elizabeth

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AB - When candidates for school-based preventive interventions are heterogeneous in their risk of poor outcomes, an intervention’s expected economic net benefits may be maximized by targeting candidates for whom the intervention is most likely to yield benefits, such as those at high risk of poor outcomes. Although increasing amounts of information about candidates may facilitate more accurate targeting, collecting information can be costly. We present an illustrative example to show how cost-benefit analysis results from effective intervention demonstrations can help us to assess whether improved targeting accuracy justifies the cost of collecting additional information needed to make this improvement.

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