Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Following Radical Cystoprostatectomy: Analysis of a Nationwide Insurance Claims Database

Meera R. Chappidi, Max Kates, Nikolai A. Sopko, Gregory A. Joice, Jeffrey J. Tosoian, Phillip M. Pierorazio, Trinity J. Bivalacqua

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction To improve care for patients after radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP), focus on survivorship issues such as sexual function needs to increase. Previous studies have demonstrated the burden of erectile dysfunction (ED) after RCP to be as high as 89%. Aim To determine the rates of ED treatment use (phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, injectable therapies, urethral suppositories, vacuum erection devices, and penile prosthetics) in patients with bladder cancer before and after RCP to better understand current patterns of care. Methods Men with bladder cancer undergoing RCP were identified in the MarketScan database (2010–2014). ED treatment use was assessed at baseline (during the 1 year before RCP) and at 6-month intervals (0–6, 7–12, 13–18, 19–24 months) after RCP. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of ED treatment use at 6-month intervals after RCP. Outcomes ED treatment rates and predictors of ED treatment at 0–6, 7–12, 13–18, 19–24 month follow-up after RCP. Results At baseline, 6.5% of patients (77 of 1,176) used ED treatments. The rates of ED treatment use at 0 to 6, 7 to 12, 13 to 18, and 19 to 24 months after RCP were 15.2%, 12.7%, 8.1%, and 10.1% respectively. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors were the most commonly used treatment at all time points. In the multivariable model, predictors of ED treatment use at 0 to 6 months after RCP were age younger than 50 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.17, 95% CI = 1.68–6.01), baseline ED treatment use (OR = 5.75, 95% CI = 3.08–10.72), neoadjuvant chemotherapy (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.13–2.61), and neobladder diversion (OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.56–3.70). Baseline ED treatment use continued to be associated with ED treatment use at 6 to 12 months (OR = 5.63, 95% CI = 2.42–13.10) and 13 to 18 months (OR = 8.99, 95% CI = 3.05–26.51) after RCP. Clinical Implications While the burden of ED following RCP is known to be high, overall ED treatment rates are low. These findings suggest either ED treatment is low priority for RCP patients or education about potential ED therapies may not be commonly discussed with patients following RCP. Urologists should consider discussing sexual function more frequently with their RCP patients. Strengths & Limitations Strengths include the use of a national claims database, which allows for longitudinal follow-up and detailed information on prescription medications and devices. Limitations include the lack of pathologic and oncologic outcomes data. Conclusion ED treatment use after RCP is quite low. The strongest predictor of ED treatment use after RCP was baseline treatment use. These findings suggest ED treatment is a low priority for patients with RCP or education about potential ED therapies might not be commonly discussed with patients after RCP. Urologists should consider discussing sexual function more frequently with their patients undergoing RCP. Chappadi MR, Kates M, Sopko NA, et al. Erectile Dysfunction Treatment Following Radical Cystoprostatectomy: Analysis of a Nationwide Insurance Claims Database. J Sex Med 2017;14:810–817.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)810-817
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sexual Medicine
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Bladder Cancer
  • Cystectomy
  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors
  • Quality Of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

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