Equipping public spaces to facilitate rapid point-of-injury hemorrhage control after mass casualty

Craig Goolsby, Kandra Strauss-Riggs, Michael Rozenfeld, Nathan Charlton, Eric Goralnick, Kobi Peleg, Matthew J. Levy, Tim Davis, Nicole Hurst

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

In response to increasing violent attacks, the Stop the Bleed campaign recommends that everyone have access to both personal and public bleeding-control kits. There are currently no guidelines about how many bleeding victims public sites should be equipped to treat during a mass casualty incident. We conducted a retrospective review of intentional mass casualty incidents, including shootings, stabbings, vehicle attacks, and bombings, to determine the typical number of people who might benefit from immediate hemorrhage control by a bystander before professional medical help arrives. On the basis of our analysis, we recommend that planners at public venues consider equipping their sites with supplies to treat a minimum of 20 bleeding victims during an intentional mass casualty incident.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-241
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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