Epstein-Barr virus infection alters cellular signal cascades in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells

Angela Kwok Fung Lo, Wai Lo Kwok, Wah Tsao Sai, Lok Wong Hing, Jan Wai Ying Hui, Fai To Ka, S. Diane Hayward, Loon Chui Yiu, Lung Lau Yu, Kenzo Takada, Dolly P. Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection is a critical event in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tumori-genesis. EBV-encoded genes have been shown to be involved in immune evasion and in the regulation of various cellular signaling cascades. To elucidate the roles of EBV in NPC development, stable infection of EBV in nasopharyngeal epithelial cell lines was established. Similar to primary tumors of NPC, these infected cells exhibited a type II EBV latency expression pattern. In this study, multiple cellular signaling pathways in EBV-infected cells were investigated. We first demonstrated that in vitro EBV infection resulted in the activation of STAT3 and NFκB signal cascades in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Increased expression of their downstream targets (c-Myc, Bcl-xL, IL-6, LIF, SOCS-1, SOCS-3, VEGF, and COX-2) was also observed. Moreover, EBV latent infection induced the suppression of p38-MAPK activities, but did not activate PKR cascade. Our findings suggest that EBV latent infection is able to manipulate multiple cellular signal cascades to protect infected cells from immunologic attack and to facilitate cancer development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-180
Number of pages8
JournalNeoplasia
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Human Herpesvirus 4
Epithelial Cells
Virus Latency
Immune Evasion
p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Interleukin-6
Neoplasms
Cell Line
Genes
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Keywords

  • Cell signaling
  • Epstein-Barr virus
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
  • NFκB
  • STAT3

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Lo, A. K. F., Kwok, W. L., Sai, W. T., Hing, L. W., Hui, J. W. Y., Ka, F. T., ... Huang, D. P. (2006). Epstein-Barr virus infection alters cellular signal cascades in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Neoplasia, 8(3), 173-180. https://doi.org/10.1593/neo.05625

Epstein-Barr virus infection alters cellular signal cascades in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. / Lo, Angela Kwok Fung; Kwok, Wai Lo; Sai, Wah Tsao; Hing, Lok Wong; Hui, Jan Wai Ying; Ka, Fai To; Hayward, S. Diane; Yiu, Loon Chui; Yu, Lung Lau; Takada, Kenzo; Huang, Dolly P.

In: Neoplasia, Vol. 8, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 173-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lo, AKF, Kwok, WL, Sai, WT, Hing, LW, Hui, JWY, Ka, FT, Hayward, SD, Yiu, LC, Yu, LL, Takada, K & Huang, DP 2006, 'Epstein-Barr virus infection alters cellular signal cascades in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells', Neoplasia, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 173-180. https://doi.org/10.1593/neo.05625
Lo, Angela Kwok Fung ; Kwok, Wai Lo ; Sai, Wah Tsao ; Hing, Lok Wong ; Hui, Jan Wai Ying ; Ka, Fai To ; Hayward, S. Diane ; Yiu, Loon Chui ; Yu, Lung Lau ; Takada, Kenzo ; Huang, Dolly P. / Epstein-Barr virus infection alters cellular signal cascades in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. In: Neoplasia. 2006 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 173-180.
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