Epstein-Barr-encoded RNA in situ hybridization: Diagnostic applications

Richard F Ambinder, Risa B. Mann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with a variety of malignancies and other diseases. Highly restricted viral antigen expression and low viral genome copy number in infected tissues impede conventional immunohistochemical or in situ hybridization approaches to the detection of virus in these tissues. In situ hybridization detection of two small but very abundant nuclear RNAs known as the EBERs serves as an alternative approach. The EBERs are stable over time and can be detected in all common fixatives. This technique facilitates characterization of the cellular locus of latent EBV infection in histologically complex tissues, such as Hodgkin's disease and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with dysproteinemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)602-605
Number of pages4
JournalHuman Pathology
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

In Situ Hybridization
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
RNA
Immunoblastic Lymphadenopathy
Nuclear RNA
Fixatives
Viral Antigens
Viral Genome
Hodgkin Disease
Viruses
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • EBER
  • Epstein-Barr
  • Hodgkin's disease
  • in situ hybridization
  • nasopharyngeal carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Epstein-Barr-encoded RNA in situ hybridization : Diagnostic applications. / Ambinder, Richard F; Mann, Risa B.

In: Human Pathology, Vol. 25, No. 6, 1994, p. 602-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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