Epidemiology of multiple childhood traumatic events: Child abuse, parental psychopathology, and other family-level stressors

Christian Menard, K. J. Bandeen-Roche, H. D. Chilcoat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Multiple family-level childhood stressors are common and are correlated. It is unknown if clusters of commonly co-occurring stressors are identifiable. The study was designed to explore family-level stressor clustering in the general population, to estimate the prevalence of exposure classes, and to examine the correlation of sociodemographic characteristics with class prevalence. Method: Data were collected from an epidemiological sample and analyzed using latent class regression. Results: A six-class solution was identified. Classes were characterized by low risk (prevalence = 23%), universal high risk (7 %), family conflict (11 %), household substance problems (22 %), non-nuclear family structure (24 %), parent's mental illness (13 %). Conclusions: Class prevalence varied with race and welfare status, not gender. Interventions for childhood stressors are person-focused; the analytic approach may uniquely inform resource allocation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-865
Number of pages9
JournalSocial psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
Volume39
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2004

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Epidemiology
  • Latent class analysis
  • Multiple stressors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Epidemiology of multiple childhood traumatic events: Child abuse, parental psychopathology, and other family-level stressors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this