Epidemiology of brachial plexus injury in the pediatric multitrauma population in the United States: Clinical article

Michael J. Dorsi, Hsu Wesley, Allan J. Belzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Object. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of brachial plexus injury (BPI) in pediatric multitrauma patients. Methods. The National Pediatric Trauma Registry was queried using the ICD-9 code 953.4, injury to brachial plexus, to identify cases of BPI. The patient demographics, mechanism of trauma, and associated ICD-9 diagnoses were analyzed. Results. Brachial plexus injuries were identified in 113 (0.1%) of the 103,434 injured children entered in the registry between April 1, 1985, and March 31, 2002. Sixty-nine patients (61%) were male. Injuries were most often caused by motor vehicle accidents involving passengers (36 cases [32%]) or pedestrians (19 cases [17%]). Head injuries were diagnosed in 47% of children and included concussion in 27%, intracranial bleeds in 21%, and skull fractures in 14%. Upper-extremity vascular injury occurred in 16%. The most common musculoskeletal injuries were fractures of the humerus (16%), ribs (16%), clavicle (13%), and scapula (11%). Spinal fractures occurred in 12% of patients, and spinal cord injury occurred in 4%. The Injury Severity Score ranged from 1 to 75, with a mean score of 10, and 6 patients (5%) died as a result of injuries sustained during a traumatic event. Conclusions. Brachial plexus injuries occur in 0.1% of pediatric multitrauma patients. Motor vehicle accidents and pedestrians struck by a motor vehicle are the most common reasons for BPIs in this population. Common associated injuries include head injuries, upper-extremity vascular injuries, and fractures of the spine, humerus, ribs, scapula, and clavicle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-577
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Brachial plexus injury
  • National pediatric trauma registry
  • Nerve injury
  • Prevalence
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Epidemiology of brachial plexus injury in the pediatric multitrauma population in the United States: Clinical article'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this