Epidemiology and the health care revolution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: Revolutions in the health care marketplace, with their implied dependence upon the population perspective, have renewed interest in epidemiologic methods and their application. METHODS: As a way of organizing questions, data, and answers, epidemiology is once again the core scientific discipline for a multidimensional paradigm shift that emphasizes five facets of health care. First, the health of enrolled populations, rather than merely treatment of sick individuals presenting for care. Second, assessment of the 'time, place, and person' of disease burden-who is healthy, who is not, and what it will take to maximize their health. Third, the causative factors for disease and the factors or characteristics that promote health. Fourth, the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines for clinicians and consumers alike. Fifth, evaluation of the impact providers are having on the health of populations (outcomes), individually and collectively. RESULTS: Thoughtful consideration of all of the above factors depends upon epidemiologic data and insights brought to a firm and conclusive end point capable of supporting policy. CONCLUSIONS: Credibility will require that epidemiologists (and the symbiotic media) exercise far greater restraint in drawing definitive conclusions and speculations from often startling but meager data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-529
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1997

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Epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Population
Epidemiologic Methods
Guidelines
Exercise
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Capitated
  • Care
  • Clinical Guidelines
  • Cost- benefit
  • Epidemiology
  • Etiology
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

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Epidemiology and the health care revolution. / Sommer, Alfred.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 7, No. 8, 11.1997, p. 526-529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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