Epidemiology and outcomes of invasive fungal infections in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in the era of antifungal prophylaxis: A single-centre study with focus on emerging pathogens

Dora E. Corzo-León, Michael J. Satlin, Rosemary Soave, Tsiporah B. Shore, Audrey N. Schuetz, Samantha E. Jacobs, Thomas J. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With increased use of expanded-spectrum triazoles for antifungal prophylaxis, the epidemiology of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) continues to evolve. To define the contemporary epidemiology of IFIs in this population, we reviewed all European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Mycoses Study Group proven and probable IFIs in adults transplanted from 2002 to 2011 and determined the incidence and risk factors for IFI and post-IFI mortality. All patients received antifungal prophylaxis. Fifty-three (14%) of 378 allogeneic HSCT recipients developed an IFI. There were 62 IFI episodes, of which aspergillosis (n = 31; 50%) and candidaemia (n = 15; 24%) were most common. Sixteen episodes (26%) were caused by other fungi, including Mucorales (n = 6; 10%) and the following uncommon pathogens: Trichosporon asahii, Arthrographis sp., Cladosporium sp., Geosmithia argillacea and Hormographiella aspergillata. Independent IFI risk factors were hospitalisation in an intensive care unit [ICU; odds ratio (OR) = 6.0], graft-versus-host disease (OR = 5.3), central venous catheter use (OR = 5.2) and hypoalbuminaemia (OR = 0.3 g-1 dl-1 increase in albumin). The 90-day mortality rate after IFI was 57%. Non-cytomegalovirus systemic viral co-infection (OR = 3.5) and stay in an ICU (OR = 2.9) were independent risk factors for death. Despite antifungal prophylaxis, IFIs remain common after allogeneic HSCT and previously uncommon pathogens are emerging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-336
Number of pages12
JournalMycoses
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Epidemiology
Transplants
Odds Ratio
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Mucorales
Invasive Fungal Infections
Transplant Recipients
Trichosporon
Candidemia
Cladosporium
Hypoalbuminemia
Triazoles
Aspergillosis
Central Venous Catheters
Mortality
Mycoses
Graft vs Host Disease
Virus Diseases
Coinfection

Keywords

  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation
  • Invasive fungal infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Epidemiology and outcomes of invasive fungal infections in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in the era of antifungal prophylaxis : A single-centre study with focus on emerging pathogens. / Corzo-León, Dora E.; Satlin, Michael J.; Soave, Rosemary; Shore, Tsiporah B.; Schuetz, Audrey N.; Jacobs, Samantha E.; Walsh, Thomas J.

In: Mycoses, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 325-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corzo-León, Dora E. ; Satlin, Michael J. ; Soave, Rosemary ; Shore, Tsiporah B. ; Schuetz, Audrey N. ; Jacobs, Samantha E. ; Walsh, Thomas J. / Epidemiology and outcomes of invasive fungal infections in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in the era of antifungal prophylaxis : A single-centre study with focus on emerging pathogens. In: Mycoses. 2015 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 325-336.
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abstract = "With increased use of expanded-spectrum triazoles for antifungal prophylaxis, the epidemiology of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) continues to evolve. To define the contemporary epidemiology of IFIs in this population, we reviewed all European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Mycoses Study Group proven and probable IFIs in adults transplanted from 2002 to 2011 and determined the incidence and risk factors for IFI and post-IFI mortality. All patients received antifungal prophylaxis. Fifty-three (14{\%}) of 378 allogeneic HSCT recipients developed an IFI. There were 62 IFI episodes, of which aspergillosis (n = 31; 50{\%}) and candidaemia (n = 15; 24{\%}) were most common. Sixteen episodes (26{\%}) were caused by other fungi, including Mucorales (n = 6; 10{\%}) and the following uncommon pathogens: Trichosporon asahii, Arthrographis sp., Cladosporium sp., Geosmithia argillacea and Hormographiella aspergillata. Independent IFI risk factors were hospitalisation in an intensive care unit [ICU; odds ratio (OR) = 6.0], graft-versus-host disease (OR = 5.3), central venous catheter use (OR = 5.2) and hypoalbuminaemia (OR = 0.3 g-1 dl-1 increase in albumin). The 90-day mortality rate after IFI was 57{\%}. Non-cytomegalovirus systemic viral co-infection (OR = 3.5) and stay in an ICU (OR = 2.9) were independent risk factors for death. Despite antifungal prophylaxis, IFIs remain common after allogeneic HSCT and previously uncommon pathogens are emerging.",
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