Epidemiologic Study of Sleep Disturbances and Psychiatric Disorders: An Opportunity for Prevention?

Daniel E. Ford, Douglas B. Kamerow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As part of the National Institute of Mental Health Epidemiologic Catchment Area study, 7954 respondents were questioned at baseline and 1 year later about sleep complaints and psychiatric symptoms using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Of this community sample, 10.2% and 3.2% noted insomnia and hypersomnia, respectively, at the first interview. Forty percent of those with insomnia and 46.5% of those with hypersomnia had a psychiatric disorder compared with 16.4% of those with no sleep complaints. The risk of developing new major depression was much higher in those who had insomnia at both interviews compared with those without insomnia (odds ratio, 39.8; 95% confidence interval, 19.8 to 80.0). The risk of developing new major depression was much less for those who had insomnia that had resolved by the second visit (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 5.3). Further research is needed to determine if early recognition and treatment of sleep disturbances can prevent future psychiatric disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1479-1484
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume262
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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