Epidemiologic study of insect allergy in children. II. Effect of accidental stings in allergic children

Kenneth C Schuberth, Lawrrence M. Lichtenstein, Anne Kagey-Sobatka, Moyses Szklo, Kathleen A. Kwiterovich, Martin D. Valentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One hundred eighty-one children with non-life-threatening reactions to insect stings and positive venom skin tests were randomized to treatment (53) or no-treatment (128) groups and followed up clinically and immunologically for at least two years to assess the results of accidental stings. Twenty-eight stings in 17 treated patients and 74 stings in 47 untreated children occurred, leading to one mild reaction in a treated patient, and eight in the no-treatment group (P=NS). No reaction was more serious than the original. Based on IgE antibody changes and skin test results, 87% of the untreated children were stung by insect to which they had clinical sensitivity by skin test. Vespid skin test sensitivity decreased 10-fold or more in both treated (72%) and untreated (44%) children. Of those with increased sensitivity. ≅ 70% had been stung. These data indicate that the incidence of sever reactions on resting is low in insect-allergic children, and that the majority show decreased skin test sensitivity over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-365
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Bites and Stings
Skin Tests
Insects
Epidemiologic Studies
Hypersensitivity
Insect Bites and Stings
Venoms
Immunoglobulin E
Therapeutics
Antibodies
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Epidemiologic study of insect allergy in children. II. Effect of accidental stings in allergic children. / Schuberth, Kenneth C; Lichtenstein, Lawrrence M.; Kagey-Sobatka, Anne; Szklo, Moyses; Kwiterovich, Kathleen A.; Valentine, Martin D.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 102, No. 3, 1983, p. 361-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schuberth, Kenneth C ; Lichtenstein, Lawrrence M. ; Kagey-Sobatka, Anne ; Szklo, Moyses ; Kwiterovich, Kathleen A. ; Valentine, Martin D. / Epidemiologic study of insect allergy in children. II. Effect of accidental stings in allergic children. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 1983 ; Vol. 102, No. 3. pp. 361-365.
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