Epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of human rhinovirus infection among otherwise healthy children and adults. Rhinovirus among adults and children

Wei Ju Chen, John C. Arnold, Mary P. Fairchok, Patrick J. Danaher, Erin A. McDonough, Patrick J. Blair, Josefina Garcia, Eric S. Halsey, Christina Schofield, Martin Ottolini, Deepika Mor, Michelande Ridoré, Timothy H. Burgess, Eugene V. Millar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major cause of influenza-like illness (ILI) in adults and children. Differences in disease severity by HRV species have been described among hospitalized patients with underlying illness. Less is known about the clinical and virologic characteristics of HRV infection among otherwise healthy populations, particularly adults. Objectives: to characterize molecular epidemiology of HRV and association between HRV species and clinical presentation and viral shedding. Study design: observational, prospective, facility-based study of ILI was conducted from February 2010 to April 2012. Collection of nasopharyngeal specimens, patient symptoms, and clinical information occurred on days 0, 3, 7, and 28. Patients recorded symptom severity daily for the first 7 days of illness in a symptom diary. HRV was identified by RT-PCR and genotyped for species determination. Cases who were co-infected with other viral respiratory pathogens were excluded from the analysis. We evaluated the associations between HRV species, clinical severity, and patterns of viral shedding. Results: eighty-four HRV cases were identified and their isolates genotyped. Of these, 62 (74%) were >18 years. Fifty-four were HRV-A, 11HRV-B, and 19HRV-C. HRV-C infection was more common among children than adults (59% vs. 10%, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-82
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Rhinovirus
Infection
Virus Shedding
Human Influenza
Specimen Handling
Sick Leave
Molecular Epidemiology
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • HRV genotypes
  • Military
  • Rhinovirus
  • Viral shedding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of human rhinovirus infection among otherwise healthy children and adults. Rhinovirus among adults and children. / Chen, Wei Ju; Arnold, John C.; Fairchok, Mary P.; Danaher, Patrick J.; McDonough, Erin A.; Blair, Patrick J.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Schofield, Christina; Ottolini, Martin; Mor, Deepika; Ridoré, Michelande; Burgess, Timothy H.; Millar, Eugene V.

In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Vol. 64, 01.03.2015, p. 74-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, WJ, Arnold, JC, Fairchok, MP, Danaher, PJ, McDonough, EA, Blair, PJ, Garcia, J, Halsey, ES, Schofield, C, Ottolini, M, Mor, D, Ridoré, M, Burgess, TH & Millar, EV 2015, 'Epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of human rhinovirus infection among otherwise healthy children and adults. Rhinovirus among adults and children', Journal of Clinical Virology, vol. 64, pp. 74-82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2015.01.007
Chen, Wei Ju ; Arnold, John C. ; Fairchok, Mary P. ; Danaher, Patrick J. ; McDonough, Erin A. ; Blair, Patrick J. ; Garcia, Josefina ; Halsey, Eric S. ; Schofield, Christina ; Ottolini, Martin ; Mor, Deepika ; Ridoré, Michelande ; Burgess, Timothy H. ; Millar, Eugene V. / Epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of human rhinovirus infection among otherwise healthy children and adults. Rhinovirus among adults and children. In: Journal of Clinical Virology. 2015 ; Vol. 64. pp. 74-82.
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AU - Danaher, Patrick J.

AU - McDonough, Erin A.

AU - Blair, Patrick J.

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AU - Ottolini, Martin

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