Enzymatic analysis for rapid detection of microbial infection in human body fluids: An overflow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

One possible means of rapidly detecting microorganisms in patients with suspected infectious diseases is the direct measurement of microbial enzymes in body fluids. This technique is based on the fact that bacterial, fungal, and viral organisms possess enzymes that are not produced by mammalian cells and are thus not found in uninfected human body fluids. Detection of one of these microbial enzymes in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or other body fluids would thus be indicative of microbial infection. Potentially useful enzymes for this purpose include bacterial β-lactamases, fungal adenine deaminases, and viral thymidine kinases. In addition, glycosidases such as neuraminidases and galactosidases can be used as markers for microbial infection, provided that the enzymatic activity can be appropriately identified as being of microbial origin. The direct measurement of microbial enzymes offers great potential for the rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1490-1498
Number of pages9
JournalClinical chemistry
Volume27
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Enzymatic analysis for rapid detection of microbial infection in human body fluids: An overflow'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this