Entry into primary care-based buprenorphine treatment is associated with identification and treatment of other chronic medical problems

Theresa A. Rowe, Janet S. Jacapraro, Darius A. Rastegar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Buprenorphine is an effective treatment for opioid dependence that can be provided in a primary care setting. Offering this treatment may also facilitate the identification and treatment of other chronic medical conditions. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 168 patients who presented to a primary care clinic for treatment of opioid dependence and who received a prescription for sublingual buprenorphine within a month of their initial visit. Results: Of the 168 new patients, 122 (73%) did not report having an established primary care provider at the time of the initial visit. One hundred and twenty-five patients (74%) reported at least one established chronic condition at the initial visit. Of the 215 established diagnoses documented on the initial visit, 146 (68%) were not being actively treated; treatment was initiated for 70 (48%) of these within one year. At least one new chronic medical condition was identified in 47 patients (28%) during the first four months of their care. Treatment was initiated for 39 of the 54 new diagnoses (72%) within the first year. Conclusions: Offering treatment for opioid dependence with buprenorphine in a primary care practice is associated with the identification and treatment of other chronic medical conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number22
JournalAddiction Science and Clinical Practice
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 28 2012

Keywords

  • Buprenorphine
  • Chronic Medical Condition
  • Initial Visit
  • Primary Care Practice
  • Primary Care Setting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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